Costa Rica

Transects to Investigate the Composition and Origin of the Central American Volcanic Arc (TICO-CAVA)

PIs:

Steven Holbrook (U of Wyoming)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OBS deployments for the second leg of the TICO-CAVA experiment.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #0405654): Under this award, the PIs will carry out an active-source seismic investigation of the volcanic arc, backarc, and downgoing plate in the Costa Rican portion of the Central American Focus Site. The program focuses on the central Costa Rican segment of the arc, a site of marked transitions in lava chemistry, because the narrow isthmus here is well-suited for detailed seismic imaging using onshore-offshore techniques. This location also enables the incorporation of data from the regional Costa Rican seismic network with the proposed areal active-source array. This combination will result in a detailed 3D image of arc crustal structure in the area. The goals are to determine the basic crustal architecture, composition, integrated magma flux, and fractionation processes of the arc, and to constrain the degree of hydration (e.g., serpentinization) in the downgoing Cocos Plate lithosphere. The work addresses the following: (1) What is the bulk composition of the Central American arc and, by inference, of its primary magma? (2) What is the long-term magma flux into the arc, and how does it compare to other arcs? (3) What are the length scales and degree of lateral variability in the Costa Rica arc? (4) Does the state of hydration of oceanic crust and upper mantle vary along the arc, and if so, does it correlate with changes in the "fluid signal" (e.g., Ba/La) of arc lavas?

Cruises

2/16/2008 - 3/9/2008

MGL0804 & MGL0807 on board the R/V Langseth.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code XB and assembled data set ID #08-012 and #08-003 at the IRIS DMC. Research using OBSIP data should incorporate the suggested general OBSIP citation (http://www.obsip.org/about/citations/).

Gulf of Mexico Hydrates

Gulf of Mexico Hydrates (2011)

 

PIs:

Peter Gerstoft (SIO) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gulf of Mexico, MC118 April 2011 experiment. Acoustic source position during south-to-north active survey. 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from Carriere and Gerstoft, doi: 10.1190/GEO2012-0241.1):  

The study and monitoring of complex natural marine hydrates require long-term or periodic data collection. For this purpose, data collected from long-term deployment of ocean-bottom seism- ometers (OBS) can be used for detecting and monitoring changes in hydrate distribution and other hydrocarbon related subsurface process. In this paper, empirical Green’s functions are extracted from crosscorrelated signals collected over a 2D transect of OBS. Results are used to estimate seismic reflectivity of the shallow subsurface.

Data were acquired at Woolsey Mound, a very active carbonate/ hydrates structure in Mississippi Canyon Lease Block 118 (MC118), Northern Gulf of Mexico, used as seafloor observatory by the Hydrates Research Consortium for more than a decade (McGee et al., 2009). The mound is about 1 km in diameter and located in nearly 900-m water depth. Recent study of the mound subsurface integrating several seismic data sets at different resolutions (backscatter, autonomous underwater vehicle [AUV], and shallow source/deep receiver [SSDR] surveys) has shown that the mound is formed by crestal normal faults nucleating at the top of a diapir- shaped salt body present in the shallow subsurface (Macelloni et al., 2012). The OBS transect used here crosses one of the main normal faults of the mound. 

Cruises

4/3/2011 - 4/8/2011

15 WHOI instruments were deployed and recovered a few days later along the Woolsey Mound site.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code XJ and assembled data set ID #11-018 at the IRIS DMC.

Gulf of Mexico Hydrates

Gulf of Mexico Hydrates (2013)

 

PIs:

Seth Haines (USGS) 

Patrick Hart (CMGP)

 

 

Sound Waves Article

 

 

Stars show the sites of seismic surveys conducted on the research vessel Pelican in April and May 2013 to image previously identified deepwater gas hydrate deposits in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from USGS):  

The U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition cruise at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313) in the Gulf of Mexico from April 18 to May 3, 2013, acquiring multicomponent and high-resolution 2D seismic data.

GC955 and WR313 are established, world-class study sites where high gas hydrate saturations exist within reservoir-grade sands in this long-established petroleum province. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data acquired in 2009 by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project provide detailed characterization at the borehole locations, and industry seismic data provide regional- and local-scale structural and stratigraphic characterization. Significant remaining questions regarding lithology and hydrate saturation between and away from the boreholes spurred new geophysical data acquisition at these sites. The goals of our 2013 surveys were to (1) achieve improved imaging and characterization at these sites and (2) refine geophysical methods for gas hydrate characterization in other locations.

In the area of GC955 we deployed 21 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and acquired approximately 400 km of high-resolution 2D streamer seismic data in a grid with line spacing as small as 50 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km and diverse azimuths for the OBS. In the area of WR313 we deployed 25 OBS and acquired approximately 450 km of streamer seismic data in a grid pattern with line spacing as small as 250 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km for the OBS. These new data afford at least five times better resolution of the structural and stratigraphic features of interest at the sites and enable considerably improved characterization of lithology and the gas and gas hydrate systems.

Our recent survey represents a unique application of dedicated geophysical data to the characterization of confirmed reservoir-grade gas hydrate accumulations.

Cruises

4/18/2013 - 5/3/2013

21 WHOI instruments were deployed in the Green Canyon site and 25 were deployed in the Walker Ridge site onboard the R/V Pelican. 2D seismic data was collected over a combined area of ~850km at tight spacing of 50-250m and source offsets of less than 10 km.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code XZ and assembled data set ID #13-010 at the IRIS DMC.

Mariana

Multi-Scale Seismic Imaging of the Mariana Subduction Factory

 

PIs:

Doug Wiens (WUSTL)

 

 

Experiment Website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #0001938): An integrated multi-institutional effort of multi-scale seismic imaging of the Mariana Subduction Factory (MSF). The PIs will conduct multi-channel seismic reflection profiling, controlled-source wide-angle reflection/refraction profiling and passive recording of local and teleseismic earthquakes through OBS deployment to be carried out with Japanese investigators. The data will provide a comprehensive velocity and attenuation, structural and stratigraphic image of the MSF. The principal objectives of the study are to understand: 1) velocity and attenuation structure of the mantle, 2) large-scale flow of the mantle wedge, 3) velocity structure of the subducting oceanic crust, 4) seismic stratigraphy and structure of the forearc, arc and remnant arc, 5) the magma chamber below the volcanoes, 6) a possible double seismic zone, and 7) updip an downdip limits of the seismogenic zone. The study will also help in the planning and eventual drilling in the Mariana island arc system.

Cruises

April 2003 - May 2003

40 LDEO instruments were deployed via the R/V Ewing. 

2004

40 LDEO instruments were recovered.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed will be archived under temporary network code YY at the IRIS DMC. Research using OBSIP data should incorporate the suggested general OBSIP citation (http://www.obsip.org/about/citations/).

Gorda

Gorda

Seismicity, Structure and Dynamics of the Gorda Deformation Zone

 

deployment map

PIs:

John Nabelek (OSU)
Jochen Braunmiller (USF)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Award #1131767 Abstract):

Plate Tectonics is the notion that the Earth's surface is comprised of large plates that form at mid-ocean ridges and are consumed by the process of subduction, largely near the margins of ocean basins. The plate tectonic model explains many observable phenomena, including the distribution of great earthquakes and violent volcanic eruptions. A central assumption of plate tectonic theory is that the plates are rigid. This assumption applies to most of the Earth's surface, but there are exceptions. One exceptional region is the Gorda Basin, which is located west of northern California and southern Oregon. There is compelling evidence that the seafloor in this region is actively deforming - including the occurrence of numerous earthquakes - but just how the seafloor is deforming and why has eluded unambiguous interpretation for several decades. This deployment of Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBS) has the objective of yielding a more detailed picture of earthquake seismicity in the Gorda Basin, and thereby resolving the manor and cause of the deformation. There is added interest in this problem because the Gorda Basin is being actively subducted beneath the adjacent continent, where major "megathrust" earthquakes are known to have occurred. How deformation of the Garda Basin affects the potential for large damaging earthquakes in this region is unknown, but of considerable societal interest. An added broader impact of this project is that the deployment of OBSs for this project will supplement the Cascadia Initiative, an amphibious deployment of OBSs offshore and seismic stations onshore. A principal aim of the Cascadia Initiative is to develop a better understanding of seismicity and of megathrust earthquake risk along the Cascadia margin, which extends from northern California to southern British Columbia.

 

Cruises

10/9/2013 - 10/17/2013

2 SIO broadband, 8 SIO short period, and 7 LDEO broadband ocean bottom seismometers were deployed on the R/V Oceanus.

10/28/2013 - 11/5/2013

13 SIO broadband, 17 SIO short period, and 8 LDEO broadband ocean bottom seismometers were deployed on the R/V Oceanus.

7/24/2014 - 8/6/2014

10 SIO short period ocean bottom seismometers were recovered on the R/V Oceanus, and 10 SIO broadbands were deployed.

8/9/2014 - 8/14/2014

15 SIO broadband and 15 SIO short period ocean bottom seismometers were recovered on the R/V Oceanus, and 10 SIO short period and 5 SIO broadbands were deployed.

9/6/2014 - 9/25/2014

15 LDEO broadbands were recovered on the R/V Oceanus, and 1 LDEO was deployed.

9/8/2015 - 9/22/2015

15 SIO broadband and 10 SIO short period ocean bottom seismometers were recovered on the R/V Oceanus.

9/30/2015 - 10/15/2015

1 LDEO ocean bottom seismometer was recovered on the R/V Oceanus.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code Z5 at the IRIS DMC.

STAG

Seismicity, Structure, and Fluid Flow of the TAG Hydrothermal System (STAG)

deployment map

 

PIs:

Robert Sohn (WHOI)
Susan Humphris (WHOI)
Juan Pablo Canales (WHOI)
 

 

Experiment Website

JGR Publication

G Cubed Publication

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #0137329): This project will monitor microearthquake activity, vent exit temperatures, and tidal pressures at the TAG hydrothermal site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge 26 degrees north. An active-source seismic survey will be focused on the TAG segment bathymetric high. The experiment will address the nature of the heat source driving hydrothermal circulation, the relationship between the faulting on the eastern flank and fluid flow at the mound, the possible existence of a low-velocity zone beneath the rise axis, and the hydraulic connectivity of the shallow TAG mound.

This project will aim to characterize the physical properties of the landslide material via the innovative use of ambient noise recorded on the OBS and to locate microseisms from active faulting that may trigger slides.

Cruises

6/21/2003 - 7/8/2003

16 LDEO broadband and 13 WHOI short period ocean bottom seismographs were deployed on board the R/V Atlantis.

10/24/2003 - 11/9/2003

Seismic refraction survey is shot on board the R/V Maurice Ewing.

3/16/2004 - 4/10/2004

16 LDEO broadband and 13 WHOI short period ocean bottom seismographs were recovered on board the R/V Knorr.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code XI at the IRIS DMC. 

Atlantis Massif

Atlantis Massif 

Seismicity of the Atlantis Massif, Mid Atlantic Ridge

deployment map

 

PIs:

Jeff McGuire (WHOI)
Deborah Smith (WHOI)
John Collins (WHOI)

 

G Cubed Publication

Experiment Website

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from 2011 AGU Fall Meeting Abstract McGuire et al.): The Atlantis Massif, located at the intersection of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) spreading axis and the Atlantis transform fault at 30N, is an oceanic core complex. Slip along the detachment fault for the last 1.5-2 Ma has brought lower crust and mantle rocks to the seafloor and has led to one of the most striking topographic features on the MAR. Hydroacoustic data collected between 1999 and 2003 indicate seismicity at the top of the Atlantis Massif, mostly on the southeastern section; little seismic activity was hydroacoustically detected at the adjacent ridge axis. In 2005, five short-period ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) were deployed at the Atlantis Massif in a pilot experiment to determine if there was active faulting within the massif and if the seismicity rate within the massif was higher than that beneath the rift valley as suggested by the hydroacoustic data. 

Cruises

5/29/2005 - 7/1/2005

5 WHOI short period ocean bottom seismographs were deployed on board the R/V Knorr.

3/2006

5 WHOI short period ocean bottom seismographs were recovered on board the R/V Endeavor.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code ZM at the IRIS DMC. 

TOMODEC

Tomography of Deception Island Volcano, Antarctica (TOMODEC)

High-Resolution Seismic Tomography and Earthquake Monitoring at Deception Island Volcano, Antarctica

deployment map

 

PIs:

William Wilcock (UW)
 

 

 

JGR Publication

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #0230094): Deception Island volcano is an active, back arc stratovolcano with a flooded caldera that is located in Bransfield Strait. The historical eruptions at Deception have all occurred near the ring fracture and extend around the caldera. The three most recent, in 1967-1970, are unusual in that each eruptive event involved simultaneous eruptions from multiple vents. Chemical differences between the lavas are best explained if the eruptions were fed by isolated shallow intrusive pods but their synchronicity and distribution suggests that they may have been driven by an extensive magma body underlying the whole caldera. However, a recent model for the caldera suggests that it formed by progressive passive extension rather than catastrophic collapse and this model implies that magma may be less widely distributed beneath the volcano. Although the volcano has not erupted for 30 years, it is still very active. There is extensive fumarole activity, earthquake swarms in 1992 and 1999 were attributed to magma injection events, and bathymetric data suggests that the northeastern portion of the caldera is resurging at rates of up to 0.5 m/yr. However, the size, distribution and interconnectivity of subsurface magma bodies and their relationship to resurgence, the recent eruptions, and the distribution and style of faulting is poorly constrained.

There have been many seasonal experiments to monitor seismicity at Deception Island but they have all been small scale and lacked seafloor stations. While they demonstrate that the volcano is seismically active the hypocentral locations have large uncertainties and there are no focal mechanisms. No seismic tomography experiment has been attempted at Deception Island, which is perhaps rather surprising because its geometry that makes it ideal for a combined land and marine high-resolution active source experiment. 

This project represents a US component of an international project organized by Jesus Ibanez at the University of Granada, Spain. The combined objective is to deploy a joint marine-land seismic network around Deception Island for an Antarctic summer to monitor seismicity and to conduct a high-resolution active-source tomography experiment. The scientific goals of the experiment are to:

  • Understand the distribution of magma and its relationship to recent volcanic activity.
  • Understand the details of resurgence in northeastern portion of the caldera.
  • Understanding the distribution of faulting and the state of stress and its relationship to volcanic and tectonic processes.

Cruises

1/7/2005 - 1/13/2005

16 LDEO broadband ocean bottom seismographs were deployed and recovered on board the R/V Hesperides.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code XU at the IRIS DMC. 

CATSCAN

Calabria-Apennine-Tyrrhenian/Subduction Collision Accretion Network (CATSCAN) 

A Joint American-Italian Project to Monitor Earthquakes on the Most Active Seismic Belt in Italy

deployment map

 

PIs:

Maya Tolstoy (LDEO)
 

 

Experiment Website

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from experiment website): The Italian peninsula across the Mediterranean Sea is part of the tectonic plate boundary - the accommodation zone -- between the Eurasian and the African plates, which continue to move closer to each other. This motion controls the long-term evolution of the boundary, but recent geologic changes suggest a more rapid tectonic event superimposed on the slow motion of the big plates and localized to the Apennine arc. This signature event of the Italian peninsula is most dramatically manifested in the current deformation along the Calabrian portion of the arc and is the main focus of this project.

Researchers from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, and the Universita Della Calabria are working to deploy 40 portable digital broadband seismographs throughout southern Italy. These instruments will record both global and regional earthquakes for 18 months. Researchers are also working to deploy an additional 10 digital broad-band ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) offshore for a period of 12 months. Researchers will use signals from distant earthquakes to develop a catscan, or a three dimensional image, of the Earth's crust and mantle beneath the Italian Peninsula of the earth.

Cruises

10/1/2004 - 10/2/2004

10 LDEO broadband ocean bottom seismographs were deployed on board the R/V Universitatis.

8/24/2005 - 8/27/2005

At least 4 LDEO broadband ocean bottom seismographs were recovered on board the R/V Universitatis.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code YD at the IRIS DMC. 

East Coast Submarine Landslides

East Coast Submarine Landslides 

Mechanical Properties and Seismicity of East Coast Submarine Landslides

deployment map

 

PIs:

Uri ten Brink (WHOI)
 

 

Experiment Website

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from experiment website): The Atlantic continental margin is an area with relatively few earthquakes, but there is still the possibility of significant damages.  For instance, the M7.2 1929 earthquake along the continental slope of Nova Scotia, caused a large-area landslide (22,700 km2), which generated a devastating tsunami (up to 8 m in amplitude and 13 m of runup).  The Atlantic coast is vulnerable to tsunamis because of the large infrastructure and population concentrations along the coast, including on barrier islands and estuaries.  The primary potential tsunami sources for the U.S.  Atlantic coast are likely submarine landslides.  ~90% of landslide-generated tsunamis worldwide are associated with earthquakes.  Recently we have shown that the observed size distributions of landslides along the Atlantic margin can be generated if we assume that the landslides were generated by earthquakes with magnitudes 4.5-7.5 (ten Brink et al., EPSL, 2010).  In 2012, the USGS Woods Hole group led by ten Brink will conduct an ocean bottom seismometer experiment using WHOI instruments to study the microseismicity of the slope and upper rise in a region of mapped landslides south of Martha’s Vineyard and downslope of the Pioneer Array. 

This project will aim to characterize the physical properties of the landslide material via the innovative use of ambient noise recorded on the OBS and to locate microseisms from active faulting that may trigger slides.

Cruises

7/6/2012

16 WHOI short period ocean bottom seismographs were deployed.

12/6/2012

16 WHOI short period ocean bottom seismographs were recovered.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code ZS at the IRIS DMC. 

COLZA

Central Oregon Locked Zone Array (COLZA)

Monitoring Seismicity Associated with a Possible Asperity on the Cascadia Megathrust

deployment map

 

PIs:

Anne Tréhu (OSU)

 

COLZA Website

Geology Publication

BSSA Publication

 

Experiment Summary

Taken from experiment website:

Historically, the subducting Juan de Fuca plate has produced very large thrust earthquakes along the Cascadia subduction zone. These events occur every few hundred years on average, with very little documented seismic activity in the interim. Since 2003, about 40 earthquakes have been detected in the nominally "locked" zone offshore central Oregon. Analysis of the two largest earthquakes suggests that they were low angle thrust events on the plate boundary. We are currently operating an onshore/offshore seismic array (COLZA – Central Oregon Locked Zone Array) to better constrain microseismic activity in this region. 

The COLZA experiment consists of six temporary land seismic stations from the FlexArray, part of EarthScope's USArray network of instuments, and two deployments of ocean bottom seismometers. Our data are collected and archived with the help of the Program for Array Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere (PASSCAL) and archived by the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS).

Cruises

9/2007 - 9/2007

10 short period and 3 broadband SIO ocean bottom seismographs were deployed.

7/1/2008 - 7/7/2008

10 short period and 3 broadband SIO ocean bottom seismographs were recovered and 6 were deployed on board the R/V Wecoma. 1 short period instrument released early and was washed ashore in December 2007.

7/14/2009 - 7/20/2009

Remaining ocean bottom seismographs were recovered.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed will be archived at the IRIS DMC. 

Loihi

Lo'ihi Volcano

Seismicity and 3-D velocity structure of Lo'ihi submarine volcano

deployment map

 

PIs:

Jackie Caplan-Auerbach (WWU)
 

 

Lo'ihi Website

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #0851128): Lo`ihi is an active submarine volcano and the newest volcano in the Hawaiian Chain. As the only example of the submarine phase of Hawaiian volcanism, Lo`ihi represents an excellent opportunity to understand the evolution and activity of a young hot spot volcano. However, while a great deal has been learned about Lo`ihi's morphology, petrology, chemistry and microbiology, previous studies of Lo`ihi seismicity and internal structure have been hindered by poor data quality or a lack of instrumentation. Consequently, there is a major gap in our understanding of what has been described as one of the world?s best-studied submarine volcanoes. The primary goal of this project is to investigate earthquake activity and the internal structure of the undersea Lo`ihi volcano by installing a network of ocean bottom seismometers on the volcano to perform the first high resolution study of Lo`ihi's seismicity, including a detailed 2-D tomographic image of its internal structure. The project is a pilot study to learn more about Lo`ihi with the goal of eventually performing a combined active and passive source seismic study of the region to perform a full 3-D tomographic study of Lo`ihi and the surrounding area and image the connection between this submarine volcano and the Hawaiian plume, a rising column of hot material that is thought to be the cause of volcanism in Hawaii.

Cruises

9/16/2010 - 9/23/2010

12 WHOI short period ocean bottom seismographs were deployed on board the R/V Kilo Moana.

7/24/2011 - 7/30/2011

12 WHOI short period ocean bottom seismographs were recovered on board the R/V Kilo Moana.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code 9A at the IRIS DMC. 

PLATE

Pacific Lithosphere Anisotropy and Thickness Experiment (PLATE)

Deployment near the South Shatsky Fracture Zone

 

PIs:

Don Forsyth (Brown)
Dayanthie Weeraratn (CSUN)

 

GJI Publication

JGR Publication

 

Stations deployed as part of PLATE, figure from Sotirov, 2014.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #0648387): The Earth's surface is divided into a small number of tectonic plates that move as units. The cold, upper part of the earth, called the lithosphere, is stiff, enabling the plates to move without significant internal deformation above a deformable, softer layer called the asthenosphere. Thus, it is the physical properties of the lithosphere that control the surface expression of convection within the Earth's interior, enabling plate tectonics. Despite its fundamental role in governing tectonics, the thickness of the lithosphere is difficult to measure. We propose to measure the azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh wave propagation within two ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) arrays in the western Pacific as a means of unambiguously determining the thickness of the old oceanic lithosphere.

Cruises

10/9/2009 - 11/4/2009

6 LDEO broadband and 10 SIO broadband ocean bottom seismographs were deployed via the R/V Revelle.

10/15/2010 - 11/12/2010

Recovered the 12 OBS aboard the R/V Kilo Moana, 4 instruments not recovered.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code Z6 at the IRIS DMC. 

Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar

Seismicity of Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar Transforms (QDG)

Oceanic Transform Faulting: Foreshocks, Seismic and Aseismic Slip on the Quebrada, Discovery and Gofar Transforms

 

PIs:

Jeff McGuire (WHOI)
John Collins (WHOI)
Robert Detrick (WHOI)
 

 

Nature Geoscience Publication

JGR Publication

G-Cubed Publication

G-Cubed Publication

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #0351143): Aseismic fault slip is one of the most important processes in plate tectonics. Oceanic transforms are advantageous for understanding aseismic fault slip because about 90% of the plate motion is aseismic and only about 10% results in earthquakes. This project will deploy as acoustic ranging system across the Discovery transform fault for one year that will be contemporaneous with a deployment of ocean bottom seismometers. The combination of this instrumentation, Discovery's fast slip rate, and the mixture of seismic and aseismic slip on the Discovery fault will yield constraints on the portions of the fault that fail seismically and aseismically. Inferences about the seismic and aseismic regions of the fault will be combined with both passive and active source seismic imaging results that will relate the behavior of the transform to rock mechanics knowledge about the deformation properties of basalt, gabbro, serpentine, and peridotite.

Cruises

12/15/2007 - 1/17/2008

10 WHOI short period, 20 SIO broadband, and 10 WHOI Keck ocean bottom seismographs were deployed via the R/V Thomas Thompson along three oceanic transform faults. [Cruise Report]

1/11/2009 - 2/3/2009

38 of the instruments were recovered using the R/V Atlantis, two WHOI short period instruments did not respond. [Cruise Report]

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code ZD at the IRIS DMC. 

PLUME

Plume-Lithosphere Undersea Mantle Experiment (PLUME) 

A Seismic Experiment to Image the Hawaiian Hotspot and Swell

deployment map

PIs:

Gabi Laske (UCSD)
John Orcutt (SIO)
Jason Phipps Morgan (Cornell)

 

Nature News Feature

Science Publication

Nature Geoscience Publication

Figure from Dalton Nature article, click for source.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #1446414): This project will deploy 64 wide-band ocean-bottom seismometers and ten portable broad-band seismic island stations in a 15-month-long investigation. The objectives are to: locate and image the plume conduit beneath the Hawaiian hotspot, image the roots of the Hawaiian swell over a sufficient area and with a sufficient resolution to distinguish among competing hypotheses for plume-lithosphere interaction, and relate the findings from the seismic imaging experiments to geodynamical and geochemical, models for mantle plumes.

Cruises

1/7/2005 - 1/25/2005

35 broadband ocean bottom seismographs were deployed on board the R/V Melville. [Cruise Report]

1/7/2006 - 1/22/2006

32 broadband ocean bottom seismographs were recovered on board the R/V Ka'imikai-o-Kanaloa, 3 instruments were not responding. [Cruise Report]

4/12/2006 - 5/11/2006

37 broadband ocean bottom seismographs, 13 SIO and 25 WHOI, were deployed on board the R/V Kilo Moana. [Cruise Report]

5/11/2007 - 6/6/2007

28 broadband ocean bottom seismographs were recovered on board the R/V Kilo Moana, 8 were not responding and 2 did not lift off the seafloor. [Cruise Report]

2007 - 2007

Rescue mission with ROV Jason on board the R/V Kilo Moana. 1 stainless bail and 3 SIO OBS were recovered along with 2 WHOI sensor balls and 2 intact WHOI OBS. [Unoffical Report]

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code YS at the IRIS DMC. 

Bering Sea

Bering Sea Active Source Experiment

deployment map

PIs:

Ginger Barth Chief Scientist
Warren Wood Co-chief Scientist
Wayne Baldwin

 

Data Report

 

 

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from science support plan): This project is part of the U.S Extended Continental Shelf Project (http://continentalshelf.gov/) to establish the full extent of the U.S. continental shelf, consistent with international law. This particular leg will use marine geophysics in the Gulf of Alaska for the purpose of determining geologic framework, crustal nature and sediment thickness within and beyond the U.S. EEZ, from 2000m isobath (approx.) to 350 nm from the territorial baselines.

Cruises

8/7/2011 - 9/4/2001

Deployment and recovery of WHOI ocean-bottom seismometera on board the R/V Langseth.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code 2B and assembled data set ID #11-016 at the IRIS DMC. 

Southeast Indian Ridge

The Effects of Changes in Mantle Temperature on Melt Supply and Crustal Accretion

An MCS Reflection and OBH Refraction Study of the Southeast Indian Ridge

deployment map

deployment map

PIs:

James R. Cochran (LDEO)

Suzanne Carbotte (LDEO)

Maya Tolstoy (LDEO)

 

Cruise Report

GJI Publication

G-Cubed Publication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #9911720): This is a geophysical investigation of the dependence of melt supply on mantle temperature and the effects of the variation in melt supply along the Southeast Indian Ridge on the crustal accretion process. The investigation involves a seismic experiment including both refraction lines utilizing ocean-bottom hydrophones to determine variations in crustal thickness and upper mantle seismic velocity and multichannel seismic reflection surveys to determine the internal structure of the crust. Since the spreading rate and the mantle source both are nearly constant along this portion of the Southeast Indian Ridge, the along-axis variation in depth can reasonable be ascribed primarily to the effects of an along-axis variation in mantle temperature.

Cruises

12/7/2001 - 1/20/2002

6 deployments of 4 ocean-bottom hydrophones each were recovered on board the R/V Maurice Ewing.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code ZM and assembled data set ID #02-011 at the IRIS DMC. 

Exmouth and Cuvier Margins

Contrasting Styles of Continental Breakup: The Exmouth and Cuvier Margins, NW Australia

deployment map

PIs:

Neal Driscoll (SIO)

Brian Taylor (UH)

Garry Karner (LDEO)

Uri ten-Brink (USGS/WHOI)

 

Cruise Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stations that are deployed as part of the experiment (red dots) and the MCS lines.

Experiment Summary

(NSF Award #9911877, taken from project description): The Exmouth and Cuvier margin system represents one of the best locales to study the differences between wide versus narrow rifts and to define the interplay between strain partitioning, volcanism, segmentation, and the continent-ocean transition. This geophysical investigation of the Exmouth and Cuvier margins was designed to test alternate models for continental margin development, and when these results are integrated with those from other margin studies, will lead to a better overall understanding and appreciation of: the strain partitioning across margins between the brittle upper crust and the ductile lower crust and lithospheric mantle (e.g., the upper plate paradox); the interplay between extensional style (rift architecture), magmatism and detachments; the continent-ocean transition, and the origin of magnetic anomalies observed off the Exmouth and Cuvier margin; the formation of seaward-dipping reflectors along the continent-ocean boundaries and the importance of faults in their formation.

Cruises

10/29/2001 - 12/2/2001

23 SIO L-CHEAPO ocean-bottom seismometers are deployed along Line 1 on board the R/V Maurice Ewing, with 21 recovered. 20 instruments were deployed and all were recovered along Line 2.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under assembled data set ID #04-003 at the IRIS DMC. 

GLIMPSE

Gravity Lineations, Intraplate Melting, Petrologic and Seismic Expedition (GLIMPSE)

deployment map

PIs:

Don Forsyth

 

JGR Publication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stations that are deployed as part of GLIMPSE (blue circles).

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #9911729): This project addresses the origin of intraplate volcanic ridges - often called cross-grain anomalies - located on the Pacific plate. Suggestions for the origin of these ridges include small-scale confection rolls, lithospheric boudinage, and small plumes resembling mini-hotspots that originate in the upper mantle. Two neighboring intraplate ridges will be studied. Measurements will include ocean-bottom seismometer observations of mantle structure, a seismic refraction/reflection profile of crustal structure, micro- earthquake recordings, extensive geochemical probing of the melting conditions and composition of the mantle, radiometric dating of the timing of volcanc activity, and mapping of bathymetry, seafloor sidescan reflectivity, sediment thickness, and gravity and magnetic anomalies.

Cruises

2001/12/01 - 2002/11/25

Cruise from Arica to Valparaiso, Chile aboard the R/V Melville.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under under temporary network code 2A at the IRIS DMC. 

Yellowstone Lake

Hydrothermal Dynamics of Yellowstone Lake (2016)

Response of Continental Hydrothermal Systems to Tectonic, Magmatic, and Climatic Forcing

PIs:

Robert Sohn (WHOI)

 

This experiment will begin in July 2016. 

HD-YLAKE Website

 

 

 

 

Lakebed geology of Yellowstone Lake (Lisa Morgan/USGS). Click image to find out more.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #1516361): Continental hydrothermal systems have immense scientific and practical significance and are critically important to the Earth?s thermal budget and geochemical cycles. Continental hydrothermal systems are a primary source of economically important metal deposits, provide geothermal resources, support exotic ecosystems that are just beginning to be explored, and in some settings pose a significant geologic hazard via hydrothermal explosions. The subsurface conditions and processes that control these systems are poorly understood because they entail the flow of multi-phase and multi-component fluids through rocks with heterogeneous permeability fields that are perturbed by a multitude of geological and environmental processes. Carefully designed multidisciplinary field experiments and modeling efforts are required to understand the coupled processes that drive these dynamic systems and control their response to geological and environmental forcing. This project is focused on quantifying the response of continental hydrothermal systems to tectonic, magmatic, and climatic processes operating on time-scales from seconds to thousands of years. The PIs address important and timely scientific questions, such as: How do multi-phase fluids and dissolved constituents flux through hydrothermal systems? How do these systems redistribute elements to produce mineral deposits and microbial habitats? How do earthquakes and magmatic activity perturb hydrothermal systems? What triggers hydrothermal explosions? How do environmental processes and climate affect continental hydrothermal systems?

The study will involve a combination of fieldwork, data analysis, and modeling. The field program uses a combination of innovative instrument networks and sediment coring activities that will be integrated through modeling activities to study the response of the Yellowstone Lake hydrothermal system to tectonic, magmatic, and climatic forcing. Yellowstone Lake is an ideal site for this research because it hosts an active hydrothermal system located in a region with high levels of tectonic and magmatic activity that has been influenced by a broad range of climate conditions in postglacial times. Research activities will include components of geochemistry, seismology, geology, geodesy, heat flow, micropaleontology, limnology, paleoclimatology, statistics, analytical modeling, and numerical modeling, all of which are essential for unraveling the coupled processes that drive system behavior. Working on a lake-floor system provides an exceptional opportunity to study forcing-response relationships on an expanded range of time-scales spanning more than 11 orders of magnitude.

Cruises

7/8/2016 - 7/11/2016

One WHOI instrument was deployed via R/V Annie and recovered to test the recovery system that was modified for freshwater use. 

7/13/2016

Two WHOI instruments were deployed via R/V Annie and will be recovered in August. 10 additional WHOI instruments will be deployed in 2017 after the 2016 instruments are collected.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed will be archived under temporary network code YL at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy. Research using OBSIP data should incorporate the suggested general OBSIP citation (http://www.obsip.org/about/citations/) as well as a citation of the specific FDSN network DOI (doi:10.7914/SN/YL_2016).

NSF Award #1516361

GoAlaska

Gulf of Alaska (GoAlaska)

PIs:

Gail Christeson (UTIG)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map of planned survey (red lines),
offshore short period seismic deployment (yellow circles).

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the cruise report): Profiles OBS01 and OBS02 are located over sedimented 22-28 Ma oceanic crust in the Gulf of Alaska. Primary features observed in the bathymetry and magnetics (Fig. 2) are the Kodiak-Bowie seamount chain, the Aja fracture zone, and a disruption in the magnetics which is identified by Atwater and Severinghaus [1989] as a small wandering offset. Profile OBS01 is located near the trace of the small wandering offset; profile OBS02 crosses the Aja fracture zone and the Kodiak-Bowie seamount chain.

Cruises

6/16/2011 - 6/22/2011

14 WHOI ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed in two lines of 7 instruments on board the R/V Langseth. One OBS was not recovered.

Data

Data from the ocean bottom seismometers will be archived at the IRIS DMC under temporary network code 1B (2011) and assembled data set ID 11-017.

Chile

Pisagua/Iquique Crustal Tomography to Understand the Region of the Earthquake Source (PICTURES)

A high-resolution controlled-source seismic experiment to elucidate geologic controls on megathrust slip: the 2014 Pisagua, Chile earthquake sequence as a natural laboratory

PIs:

Anne Trehu (OSU)

 

This experiment is currently underway. 

Experiment Blog

 

 

 

Tectonic and seismic history of study area (Shurr et al., Nature, 2014). Click image to go to article.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #1459368): Subduction zones, where one tectonic plate plunges beneath another, are the birthplace of many of Earth's more destructive earthquakes and volcanoes. Numerous studies reveal patchiness in the distribution of slip during these earthquakes; patches with the greatest slip can occur in pattern that is the opposite of where patches characterized by aseismic deformation occur along the fault. On April 1, 2014, a magnitude 8.2 earthquake occurred offshore Chile near the town of Pisagua. This region was identified in 1991 as one of two major seismic gaps in Chile. ... The portion of the seismic 'gap' that did not slip during the Pisagua quake is marked by a distinct density high, indicating an abrupt change in crustal structure. The objective [of] this project is to collect marine geophysical data to elucidate the geologic significance of this correlation between a crustal structure and earthquake slip. This project also has an important educational component. Students from the US, Chile, Germany will participate in an shipboard course in seismic reflection data processing. 

Advances in geodetic techniques and an increase in the number of high-resolution seismic networks have brought remarkable advances in documenting the distribution of slip on subduction zone plate boundary faults prior to, during, and after great earthquakes. The main Pisagua shock was preceded by two distinct foreshock sequences that occurred in the month prior to the main shock, and it was followed by many aftershocks, the largest of which had Mw 7.8. The sequence only ruptured the northern half of the gap, leaving significant unreleased strain accumulation according to plate tectonic and geodetic locking models. This study will acquire and analyze marine seismic data to characterize the Pisagua earthquake source region. A large-volume tuned airgun array and multichannel streamer (MCS) and [50] short-period ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) operated by the US Ocean Bottom Seismometer Instrumentation Pool and the German marine research institute GEOMAR. A 3D tomographic P-wave velocity model and a grid of 2D deep-crustal seismic reflection profiles will be obtained. The velocity model and positions of reflective boundaries will be integrated with high-resolution bathymetric data to generate a geologic model of the crust that can be compared to the seismologically and geodetically-determined slip history prior to, during and after the earthquake. The program will be accomplished in two phases. During phase 1, imaging will target the region that slipped during the 2014 earthquake and acquire reconnaissance data from the remaining gap to optimize the field program for phase 2. Earthquakes recorded by this and other OBS and onshore arrays will be incorporated into the data set for 3D tomography to increase the depth extent of imaging and improve determination of S-wave velocities and Poisson's ratio. Partners in this project include Oregon State University, GEOMAR, and the Universidad de Chile.

 Proposed OBS deployment locations from cruise blog.

Cruises

10/26/2016 - 12/09/2016

50 short period Scripps Institution of Oceanography and 19 GEOMAR ocean-bottom seismometers will be deployed on board the R/V Sonne. Active source and deep crustal multichannel seismic reflection data will be collected by the R/V Langseth. This experiment will also incorporate an onshore seismic deployement through IRIS PASSCAL.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed will be archived under temporary network code XW and assembled data set ID #16-005 at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy.  Research using OBSIP data should incorporate the suggested general OBSIP citation (http://www.obsip.org/about/citations/) as well as a citation of the specific FDSN network DOI (doi:10.7914/SN/XW_2016). 

CREST

CREST (Crustal Reflectivity Experiment Southern Transect)

PIs:

Robert Reece (TAMU), Lead

Gail Christeson (U of Texas)

 

CRESTfest Cruise Blog

 

 

 

Transects that are part of CREST (black lines). Click image to see full size.

Gail Christeson, Dan Kot, and Akhil Amara check the progress of a deployed OBS as it descends to the seafloor. 
 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #1537108): Although the nature of oceanic crust has been studied for decades, many questions remain unanswered, owing to a paucity of data from crust formed more than a few million years ago. With ocean basins containing crust up to 200 m.y. in age, the history of Earth's largest tectonic plates remain to be studied. Key questions relate to chemical exchange between the crust and ocean-- does this continue beyond 7 m.y. or not, and, if so, for how long? Recent work shows that irregular seafloor on older crust can be the site of geothermal circulation that transfers material from crust to ocean. Another fundamental question is how long does an oceanic spreading segment behave in the same way- in terms of amount of magmatic activity versus tectonic rifting?

This project will use seismic imaging to measure the properties of the crust from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where new crust forms today, out to 70 m.y. old crust on the western flank of the spreading center. These data will answer questions about oceanic crustal evolution and they will provide information about where future seafloor drilling by the Integrated Ocean Discovery Program could be safely accomplished, to address questions about the evolution in ocean chemistry over long time scales. The field experiment will serve as a training platform for graduate students and early career scientists. Former veterans in a university network will be involved in aspects of the research.

The intrepid Lead PI Dr. Bobby Reece as the R/V Langseth heads out of port at Cape Verde Islands to begin the long transit south.

Cruises

1/4/2016 - 2/25/2016

30 short period OBSIP ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed in sets of seven instruments along five transects in the South Atlantic on board the R/V Langseth. 

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code YB and assembled data set ID #16-003 at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy. Research using OBSIP data should incorporate the suggested general OBSIP citation (http://www.obsip.org/about/citations/) as well as a citation of the specific FDSN network DOI (doi:10.7914/SN/YB_2016).

2016

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Start Cruise Finish
South Atlantic Reece Langseth 4-Jan-2016 25-Feb-2016
Mid-Atlantic Rychert Langseth 1-Mar-2016 25-Mar-2016
Antilles Collier James Cook 6-Mar-2016 17-Mar-2016
Chile Trehu Langseth 26-Oct-2016 9-Dec-2016
Yellowstone Lake Sohn Cutthroat 1-Jul-2016 2-Jul-2016

2017 Schedule

2017 Schedule (Last Updated 16/01/20)

Note: Schedules are posted to provide general guidance and are subject to change without notice at any time.

Santorini

Crustal Magma Plumbing of the Santorini Volcanic System

PIs:

Emilie Hooft (University of Oregon)

Douglas Toomey (University of Oregon)

 

Experiment Website

U of Oregon Article

Draft plan for transits (yellow lines), offshore
short period seismic deployment, and airgun shot profiles.

Experiment Summary

This is a large active source experiment to seismically image the magma plumbing system of an arc volcano throughout the crust and into the upper mantle. We will record the RV Langseth 7,000 cu in air gun array on 93 SP OBS and 26 land stations with an aperture of up to 100 km for 3D tomographic imaging and with sufficiently high density for full waveform inversion.

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #1459794): Santorini is an active arc volcano associated with the Mediterranean subduction zone, which accomodates tectonic convergence between Africa and Europe. Santorini recently experienced geologic unrest and this study will document the current distribution of subsurface magma. Because the volcanic system is semi submerged Santorini is an ideal site for detailed imaging using marine instrumentation. Onshore-only studies cannot achieve broad enough aperture or dense enough coverag to allow mapping of magma throughout the crust. By determining the physical properties of the crust, this international team from the U.S., U.K., and Greece, seek to understand how magma at different depths crystallizes and what that might imply about both a basic research question- how does crust that eventually makes up continents form, and a geohazard question- does the current distribution of magma indicate a likelihood of sustained volcano inflation that might precede a major eruption? 

Seismic imaging of the crust at Santorini volcano is designed to constrain the distribution of subseafloor magma and any variation in extent of apparent degree of crystallization with depth. This site is viewed as representative of silicic arc volcanoes worldwide, so results could be representative of other arc volcanoes. Ocean bottom seismometers, and land seismometers will be deployed for a few-week field experiment. Active source signals will be recorded by these instruments as well as by a towed, multi-channel streamer. Tracklines laid out along a north-east trending, 10 x 50 mile swath, with Santorini at the center, will image the lower crustal structure with unprecedented resolution. Data analysis emphasizes complementary seismic approaches: (1) Dense 3D isotropic and anisotropic travel time tomography (2) Full waveform inversion tomography and waveform modeling to obtain higher resolution and more accurate elastic properties and their spatial variability.

Cruises

11/17/2015 - 12/12/2015

93 OBSIP short period ocean-bottom seismometers from WHOI and SIO were deployed around the volcanic island of Santorini on board the R/V Langseth. 26 land stations were also deployed concurrently, and all stations recorded shots from the R/V Langseth's airgun.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code 1E and assembled data set ID #15-008 at the IRIS DMC. Land stations are archived under the temporary network code 3E. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy.

SEGMeNT

Study of Extension and maGmatism in Malawi aNd Tanzania (SEGMeNT)

PIs:

Donna Shillington (LDEO)  
Scott Nooner (UNC Wilmington)  
Cornelia Class (LDEO)  
Jim Gaherty (LDEO)  

 

SEGMeNT Website

SRL Data Mine Article

Articles on SEGMeNT Fieldwork

 

 

 

Stations that are deployed as part of SEGMeNT (red circles).

Click image to go to the IRIS DMC network map.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract): The primary scientific goal of this project is to examine the emergence and early evolution of two fundamental features of all divergent plate boundaries: magmatism and segmentation. Magmatism accommodates a significant percentage of plate separation at most mid-ocean ridges and late-stage rifts. Likewise, transform faults demarcate discrete spreading segments in mid-ocean ridges, which are broadly characterized by more robust magmatism at their centers than at their edges. Well-developed magmatic and tectonic segmentation is also observed in late-stage rifts and new ocean basins. However, little is known about the controls on the initiation and development of magmatism and segmentation in young rifts. Specifically, the PIs seek to address the following questions:

  • When, where and why does magmatism initiate in rifts, and what is its role in accommodating extension?
  • What controls the development of tectonic segmentation in early-stage rifts? How is it manifested in 4D patterns of magmatism and deformation.

The project consists of an integrated geophysical, geochemical and geological study of the northern Lake Malawi region in the East African Rift System (EARS) to address these questions. This is one of the few places in the world that has all of the ingredients necessary for a comprehensive study of early rifting. Active and passive seismic data and MT data will reveal the 3D structure of the crust and lithosphere at a variety of length scales, from the architecture of border faults and accommodation zones to the distribution of deformation and magma (if present) in the mantle lithosphere. Surface deformation, seismicity, and rift stratigraphy, as well as geochronology, thermobarometry and geochemistry of volcanic rocks, will yield constraints on the origin of magmatism and the evolution of deformation and magmatism at a range of time scales, including possibly variable contributions from sub-lithospheric versus lithospheric sources. Comparisons of active and cumulative deformation patterns will enable the evaluation of the importance of episodicity, seismicity and magmatism in accommodating extension and how they relate to segmentation. This powerful combination of temporal and spatial constraints will produce unique insights into the initiation of segmentation and magmatism during continental rifting.

 

Cruises

2/21/2015 - 3/21/2015

34 short period and 7 long period OBSIP ocean-bottom seismometers are deployed in Lake Malawi on board the R/V Ndunduma. Onshore broadband seismometers are also deployed in Malawi, Tazania in August 2013 and June/July 2014.

4/15/15 - 4/27/2015 

33 short period instruments are recovered as the active source component of the experiment comes to an end. The R/V Katundu was outfitted with equipment to tow a seismic streamer over the array in March 2015. Article

10/1/15 - 10/10/2015

7 long period seismometers are recovered. One short period instrument was unable to be recovered.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code YQ and assembled data set ID #16-010 at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy. 

2015

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Start Cruise Finish
SEGMeNT Shillington Ndunduma 21-Feb-2015 21-Mar-2015
SEGMeNT Shillington Ndunduma 15-Apr-2015 27-Apr-2015
ENAM Gaherty Endeavor 27-Mar-2015 9-Apr-2015
HOBITSS Wallace Revelle 20-Jun-2015 29-Jun-2015
Cascadia 5A Cascadia Oceanus 26-Aug-2015 4-Sep-2015
Cascadia 5B/Gorda Cascadia Oceanus 8-Sep-2015 22-Sep-2015
Cascadia 5C Cascadia Thompson 28-Sep-2015 12-Oct-2015
SEGMeNT Shillington Ndunduma 1-Oct-2015 10-Oct-2015
Santorini Hooft Langseth 17-Nov-2015 12-Dec-2015

HOBITSS

HOBITSS: Hikurangi Ocean Bottom Investigation of Tremor and Slow Slip

Principal Investigators:

Laura Wallace, University of Texas at Austin  
Anne Sheehan, University of Colorado at Boulder
Susan Schwartz, University of California at Santa Cruz
Spahr Webb, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science crew of the HOBITSS deployment cruise aboard the R/V Tangaroa. Photo credit: Jenny Nankai.

Smithsonian  - 30 August 2016 "Slow Earthquakes Are a Thing" R. Becker

Science - 6 May 2016 "Slow slip near the trench at the Hikurangi subduction zone, New Zealand" L. M. Wallace, S. C. Webb, Y. Ito, K. Mochizuki, R. Hino, S. Henrys, S. Y. Schwartz, A. F. Sheehan

Science Perspectives - 6 May 2016 "Measuring slow slip offshore" A. M. Tréhu

UT News - 5 May 2016 "World's Shallowest Slow-Motion Earthquakes Detected Off New Zealand's Coast" A. Caputo, M. Kortsha

EOS Article - 28 March 2016 "Investigations of Shallow Slow Slip Offshore of New Zealand" R. Harris

 

Experiment Summary 

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #1334654): Deployment of a network of pressure gauges and seismometers on the Hikurangi portion of the subduction zone off North Island New Zealand is designed to record a slow-slip event (SSE) expected to occur on the plate boundary fault in the 2014-2015 timeframe. SSE occur every ~18 months in this region, so documenting the deformation associated with this type of event and comparing that couple-week activity with ongoing microseismicity should illustrate the evolution of forces and associated hazards in this region. Twenty US seafloor instruments, including 10 from OBSIP, will be combined with a similar number of Japanese instruments for ~12 months. These data will be evaluated together with data from onshore geodetic and seismic stations in this international collaboration. Results will inform planning for possible future seafloor drilling by IODP and subsequent in-situ measurements.

Due to the shallow dip of the subducting plate, the Hikurangi site offers a unique opportunity to document the small signals associated with SSE, for which motion is too minor for human perception. Insights into this newly-recognized mode of plate interaction are expected to be applicable to other convergent margins. How far 'up-dip' the slip extends, whether all the way to the seafloor near the subduction trench or not, is a key unknown in current estimates of earthquake shaking and tsunami hazard. The extent of slow slip can indicate how much stress on the plate boundary fault is relieved versus building up toward an eventual megathrust earthquake.

Cruises

5/10/2014 - 5/20/2014

On board the R/V Tangaroa, 10 LDEO trawl resistant OBSs were deployed along with other instruments from University of Texas and University of Tokyo.  Cruise Blog

6/20/2015 - 6/29/2015

With the successful capture of a slow slip event occurring in September-October 2014, the R/V Revelle set out to recover the instruments.  Cruise Blog  

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code YH at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy.

HOBITSS Recovery Cruise Video

This video of the 2015 recovery cruise was created by Liz Brenner (SIO/UCSD).

A science crew of 26 aboard the R/V Roger Revelle set out from Napier port to recover the instruments that had been sitting on the seafloor for a year. This video shows the cruise from start to finish, with examples of OBS recoveries during ideal conditions and also in somewhat turbulent weather. The cruise was a great success with 100% of ocean bottom seismometers and pressure sensors returned to shore.

Cascadia Data Updates and Changes

As a community experiment, Cascadia Initiative data are immediately available to researchers. Sometimes updates to the data need to be made after the data has been released. The following is a list of updates and changes that has been made to the Cascadia Dataset. 

Cascadia Horizontal Channel Convention Reupload page

Any comments or questions can be directed to Kasey Aderhold (kasey@iris.edu).

Performance of Cascadia Initiative- Amphibious Array Workshop Paper

OBSIP has prepared a review of the performance of the Cascadia Initiative for the Future of the Amphibious Array Workshop. To register for the workshop, visit the IRIS Workshop webpage:

http://www.iris.edu/hq/workshops/2014/10/amphibious_array_facility_workshop

Downloadable versions of Cascadia Initiative Maps:

Cascadia Initiative Map

Cascadia Initiative Map with Station Names

Year 1 Cascadia Map

Year 2 Cascadia Map

Year 3 Cascadia Map

Cascadia Data Performance Map for Year 1 and Year 2

 

 

Cascadia Data Restriction and Reupload Information

The OBSIP Management Office (OMO)  restricted access on 2/28/2014 to the Cascadia Initiative dataset (network ID 7D) at the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) in order to resolve a channel naming error that results in a large number of stations having an incorrect relative orientation.

The channel-naming errors affected LDEO OBS data in Year 1 and Year 2 and the SIO OBS data for Year 2.  As a result of this change, OBSIP will make all of the Cascadia Initiative data consistent in relative orientation.

The relative orientation of the horizontal components for the Cascadia Stations were incorrectly defined. There are two options for the relative orientation of the horizontal channels.

Because OBSIP instruments are built and operated by three different IIC's, the usage of default relative horizontal orientation of channels varied in Year 1. In Year 2, all of the data was intended to be uploaded in the GSN convention (BH2 90° CW of BH1). The Cascadia data was corrected from both Year 1 and Year 2 so that all data follows the GSN convention (BH2 90° CW of BH1).

 

As of 5/2/2014, the data has been corrected and unrestricted.

H1).

UPDATED CONVENTIONS (after restriction)

PREVIOUS CONVENTIONS (prior to restriction)

 

2014

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Start Cruise Finish
MARINER 2  Canales UK vessal 03-Jan-2014 13-Jan-2014
ENAM Gaherty Endeavour 01-Apr-2014 16-Apr-2014
Cascadia 4A Cascadia Oceanus 10-May-2014 23-May-2014
HOBITSS Wallace Foreign 10-May-2014 20-May-2014
Cascadia 4B Cascadia Oceanus 28-May-2014 2-Jun-2014
Cascadia 4C Cascadia Thompson 22-Jun-2014 07-Jul-2014
Cascadia 4D Cascadia Oceanus 10-Jul-2014 20-Jul-2014
Cascadia 4E / Gorda Cascadia Oceanus 22-Jul-2014 31-Jul-2014
Gorda Nabelek Oceanus 05-Aug-2014 20-Aug-2014
Cascadia 4F / Gorda Cascadia Oceanus 06-Sep-2014 25-Sep-2014
ENAM Avendonk Endeavour 12-Sep-2014 13-Oct-2014

MARINER

MARINER (Seismic Investigation of the Rainbow Hydrothermal Field and its Tectono/Magmatic Settings, Mid-Atlantic Ridge 36° 14'N )

PI’s:

J. Pablo Canales (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
Robert Dunn (University of Hawaii)
Robert Sohn (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

MARINER Experiment Website

NSF Award: OCE-0961680

Cruise Report: MGL1305

 

 

 

Experiment Summary (taken from MARINER website):

Heat extraction from the Earth via hydrothermal systems along mid-ocean ridges (MORs) is a fundamental process affecting the Earth: hydrothermal systems extract approximately one third of the global yearly heat loss through ridges and are a primary means of chemical exchange between the solid Earth and the oceans. It is generally believed that sections of MORs with greater magma supply host a greater abundance of hydrothermal systems. While this simple conceptual model provides a framework within which to understand hydrothermal heat generation, the relative roles of magmatic heat input, tectonic heat advection, and faulting in controlling ridge thermal structure and hydrothermal circulation are still poorly understood. This is particularly important for hydrothermal circulation at slow- and ultra-slow spreading ridges, where venting occurs in a variety of host-rock lithology and tectonic setting. The Rainbow hydrothermal field (RHF) is a methane-, hydrogen- and iron-rich system located on an ultramafic massif within a tectonized non-transform discontinuity (NTD) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where current models predict that long-term magma supply should be very low. Yet Rainbow vents high-temperature fluids at high flow rates, which is difficult to explain without a magmatic heat source. This conundrum stands in the way of our ability to develop general models for the roles of magmatic heat input and tectonic faulting on controlling ridge thermal structure and hydrothermal circulation, particularly for hydrothermal systems located in regions dominated by ultramafic lithologies, which are common at slow and ultra-slow MORs.

 

Cruises

4/10/2013 - 5/19/2013

In the beginning of 2013, 46 short-period ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed in the Rainbow hydrothermal field. 15 of the short-period instruments were left on the ocean floor for a 6 month deployment. The R/V Marcus Langseth was employed to shoot airguns over the array.

1/3/2014 - 1/13/2014 

Recovery of the 15 short-period instruments that were left on the seafloor.

 

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code X3 and assembled data set ID #13-007 at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy.

ENAM

Eastern North American Margin

Community Seismic Experiment

PIs:

Harm Van Avendonk (UT Austin)
Beatrice Magnani (SMU) 
Donna Shillington (LDEO)  
Matt Hornbach (SMU) 
Jim Gaherty (LDEO)  
Brandon Dugan (Rice)  
Mareen Long (Yale)  
Anne Bécel (LDEO)  
Maggie Benoit (TCoNJ)  
Steven Harder (UT El Paso)  
Gail Christeson (UT Austin) 

 

GeoPRISM Experiment Website

ENAM Newsletter Articles

 

Draft plan for regional seismic profiles (purple lines) and offshore
broadband seismic deployment. Red lines represent vintage
seismic reflection and refraction data in the region.

Experiment Summary (taken from ENAM website)

The ENAM Community Seismic Experiment will involve the acquisition of onshore/offshore, active and passive seismic data focused on the mid-Atlantic Eastern North American rifted margin during a series of field programs in the spring and summer of 2014. The data will be openly available to the community and will also serve as the focus for short courses on active-source data analysis.

The overall location of this study was chosen based on community input from an online poll. The experiment is designed to acquire data that can be used to address key questions in the GeoPRISMS science plan concerning the formation and post-rift evolution of rifted continental margins at a variety of scales. In particular, this experiment encompasses the rifted margin from unextended continental crust onshore to oceanic crust offshore and spans multiple rift segments along the margin. It also covers several submarine landslides on the continental slope.

Cruises

4/1/2014 - 4/16/2014

30 OBSIP broadband ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed along the eastern coast of North America on board the R/V Endeavor. Onshore broadband seismometers were also deployed on the Outer Banks in May 2014. 

9/12/14 - 10/13/2014 

47 OBSIP short period ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed as the active source component of the ENAM experiment. The R/V Marcus G. Langseth was employed to shoot airguns over the array in October 2014. 80 onshore seismometers were also deployed in North Carolina and Virginia to record the offshore shots. Cruise Blog

3/27/15 - 4/9/2015

30 OBSIP broadband ocean-bottom seismometers were recovered on board the R/V Endeavor. Onshore active source seismic data was collected along three profiles in the summer of 2015. Cruise Blog

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code YO and assembled data set ID #14-005 at the IRIS DMC. This data can be accessed using all IRIS DMC request tools. Data includes:

30 WHOI broadband stations (Filtered 3 Hz, 1 Hz, and DPG channels - unfiltered high-rate redacted data available soon)
48 SIO short-period geophones (Unfiltered high-rate and hydrophone channel)
47 WHOI short-period geophones (Unfiltered high-rate, unfiltered 1 Hz, and hydrophone channels)

 

Deployment and Recovery of OBS YO.500

This video of a shallow OBS deployment and recovery was created by Ernie Aaron (SIO).

On September 30, 2014, at the end of a deployment for the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) community seismic experiment aboard the R/V Endeavor, Ernie Aaron had the idea to attach a GoPro camera to an ocean bottom seismometer (OBS). This instrument was recovered the next day and Ernie, an OBS development technician at Scripps Institute of Oceanography, put this video together to show the full experience of an instrument.  Most OBS are deployed in water depths greater than a kilometer, but this one was in very shallow water of ~29 m (95 ft) depth just under the 100 ft rating of the underwater camera housing.

       

Cascadia Channel Uptime and Data Quality Rating

Cascadia Channel Uptime and Data Quality Rating

The OBSIP Management Office has put together a summary of the Cascadia Channel Uptime and a qualitative measure of the data quality (usable vs unusable). This is meant as an initial guide for station performance, researchers should make their own assessment for their specific research project.

Each station has three lines indicating the three seismometer channels. The lines are merged so unless they differ it is difficult to see the three disticnt lines. The top line is HH1, the second HH2, and the bottom is HHZ. 

Cascadia 2013-2014 Deployment

2013_Cascadia_Channel_Status_thickline.ps

Cascadia 2012-2013 Deployment

2012_Cascadia_Channel_Status_thickline.ps

Cascadia 2011-2012 Deployment 

2011_Cascadia_Channel_Status_thickline.ps

2013

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Start Cruise Finish
Marianas 3 Wiens Melville 02-Feb-2013 15-Feb-2013
Chile 2 Trehu Point Sur 15-Mar-2013 22-Mar-2013   
Azores 1 Canales Langseth 10-Apr-2013 19-May-2013
GoMex Ruppel   15-Apr-2013 06-May-2013
SONGS Driscoll Sproul 01-Jun-2013 04-Jun-2013
Navy NPAL13 Worchester Melville 12-Jun-2013 11-Jul-2013
Cascadia 3A Cascadia Oceanus 03-Jun-2013 14-Jun-2013
Cascadia 3B Cascadia Oceanus 17-Jun-2013 23-Jun-2013
Cascadia 3C Cascadia Atlantis 25-Jun-2013 09-Jul-2013
Cascadia 3D Cascadia Oceanus 01-Aug-2013 14-Aug-2013
Cascadia 3E Cascadia Oceanus 18-Aug-2013 24-Aug-2013
Cascadia 3F Cascadia Oceanus 28-Aug-2013 10-Sep-2013
SONGS Driscoll Sproul 01-Sep-2013 30-Sep-2013
Blanco Transform 2 Nabelek Oceanus 20-Sep-2013 06-Oct-2013
Blanco Transform 3 Nabelek Oceanus 28-Sep-2013 05-Nov-2013

Cascadia Channel Naming Conventions

Download here: Cascadia Channel Naming Conventions

If you have any questions or corrections, please contact Kasey Aderhold (kasey@iris.edu) at the OBSIP Management Office.

Cascadia Data Availability Status

Presented below is the availability of the Cascadia Data in the IRIS DMC. 

Channels displayed are HH?, BH?, LH?, BX?, HX?, HDH, HXH, HKO, BDH, BKO, and LDH. 

For data availability on accelerometer channels (BN?, and BY?), download the full tables using the links below each figure. 

Any questions about availability can be sent to Kasey Aderhold (kasey@iris.edu).

 

Data Availability Status from 2011-2012 Deployment

Summary:

All data from WHOI seismometers and DPGs are uploaded
All data from SIO seismometers and DPGS are uploaded
All data from LDEO seismometers and APGs are uploaded

Full Table

 

Data Availability Status from 2012-2013 Deployment

Summary:

All data from WHOI seismometers and DPGs are uploaded
All data from SIO seismometers and DPGS are uploaded
All data from LDEO seismometers and APGs are uploaded

Full Table

 

Data Availability Status from 2013-2014 Deployment

Summary:

All seismometer/DPG data from WHOI stations available 
All seismometer/DPG from SIO stations available
LDEO seismometer and APG filtered channels available/APG redacted data not available

Cascadia_2013_avail.jpg

Full Table

 

Data Availability Status from 2014-2015 Deployment

Summary:

All seismometer and DPG data from WHOI stations available 
All seismometer and DPG data from SIO stations available 
LDEO filtered/redacted seismometer channels available/APG data not available

Full Table

2016 Schedule

2016 Schedule (Last Updated 16/05/06)

Note: Schedules are posted to provide general guidance and are subject to change without notice at any time.

2015 Schedule

Completed 2015 Schedule

2014 Schedule

Completed 2014 Schedule

2013 Schedule

Completed 2013 Schedule

 

 

Augustine Volcano

Augustine Volcano

Eruption of Augustine Volcano Being Monitored by Ocean Bottom Seismometers

 

PIs:

Uri ten Brink (USGS/WHOI)
Victor Bender (WHOI)
Michael West (UAF)
Cyrus Read (USGS)

 

Experiment Website

Homer News Article, 2, 3

Oceanus News Article

EOS Article

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the experiment website): The current eruption of Augustine Volcano, which forms the bulk of Augustine Island, began in early December 2005. Observers saw vigorous steaming from the volcano's summit, and residents of coastal communities 80 to 120 km (50-75 mi) away reported strong sulfurous odors. High-intensity, high-frequency seismic signals recorded December 1-17 are now interpreted as signs of forceful emissions of steam and other gases from the volcano, which is commonly obscured from view by darkness and cloudy weather. The difficulty of seeing Augustine Volcano means that monitoring with seismometers, which sense earthquakes caused by magma and other fluids moving beneath and within the volcano, is sometimes the only way to detect and record eruptive activity. In early February, we assembled in Homer to deploy ocean-bottom seismometers as supplements to AVO's seismic network on the island.

Cruises

2/8/2006

5 WHOI short period ocean bottom seismographs were deployed via the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Roanoke Island around Augustine Island in the Cook Inlet, Alaska to aid in the observation of volcanic activity in the area.

3/27/2006

All five instruments were recovered using the R/V Maritime Maid.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code ZV at the IRIS DMC. 

GEOPRICO

Geological, Puerto Rico-Dominican (GEOPRICO-DO) 

Survey of the Muertos Trough and the Seismogenic Zone North of the Virgin Islands

deployment map

deployment map

PIs:

Uri ten Brink (USGS/WHOI)
Andres Carbo (U. Madrid)

 

EOS Article

Marine Geology Publication

JGR Publication

 

Figures from Granja Bruña et al., Marine Geology, 2009 article, click for source.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from Carbó et al., 2005, Caribbean Geological Conference Abstract): The Northeastern Caribbean Boundary Zone (Hispaniola and Puerto Rico zone) has been widely studied from 50's, but most studies have focused on northern Hispaniola and Puerto Rico islands (e.g. Puerto Rico Trench, Bahamas Bank, Mona Rift, (Mann et al, 1995; Dolan et al, 1998; ten Brink et al, 2004), very few studies have been carried out to the south, resulting in a lack of information. During April, 2005 a marine geophysics cruise aboard the Spanish Oceanographic Research Vessel “Hespérides” was carried out in this area of the Northeastern Caribbean Plate. In the project GEOPRICO-DO, which are coordinated by Univesidad Complutense de Madrid (Geodynamics Department, Geophysics Department, Spain) and Real Obsevatorio de la Armada de San Fernando (Spain), also participate the Instituto Español de Oceanografía (Spain), Universidad de Barcelona (Spain), U.S. Geological Service/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (USGS/WHOI), Puerto Rico Seismic Network (University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez), Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo-Instituto Sismológico Universitario, Red Sísmica del Instituto Dominicano de Recursos Hidráulicos and the Department of Disaster Management (Virgin Islands). The data acquired in the cruise were; multibeam bathymetry, potential fields (gravity and magnetism), multichannel reflection seismic, deep seismic sounding with record on stations on land and streamers and OBS`s.

Cruises

3/28/2005 - 4/17/2005

10 WHOI broadband ocean bottom seismographs were deployed and recovered on board the R/V Hespérides.

3/11/2007 - 9/3/2007

5 WHOI broadband ocean bottom seismographs were deployed and recovered.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code YF and YI at the IRIS DMC. 

ETOMO

Endeavor Seismic Tomography Experiment (ETOMO)

deployment map

PIs:

Doug Toomey (U of Oregon)
Emilie Hooft (U of Oregon)
William Wilcock (U of Washington)

 

 

Experiment Website

 

 

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from experiment website): Competing models for what controls the segmentation and intensity of ridge crest processes are at odds on the scale of mantle and crustal magmatic segmentation, the distribution of hydrothermal venting with respect to a volcanic segment and the properties of the thermal boundary layer that transports energy between the magmatic and hydrothermal systems. The recent discovery of an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector beneath the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, as well as systematic along axis changes in seafloor depth, ridge crest morphology and hydrothermal venting provide an ideal target for testing conflicting hypotheses. In 2008 we will conduct a seismic experiment to investigate the 3-D structure of the crust and topmost mantle beneath the Endeavour segment, a RIDGE2000 Integrated Study Site (ISS). The scientific objectives are to: (1) Determine if the segmentation and intensity of the magma-hydrothermal systems at the Endeavour ridge are related to magma supply or to the magma plumbing between the mantle and crust, and (2) Constrain the thermal and magmatic structure underlying the Endeavour hydrothermal system in order to understand the patterns of energy transfer.

Cruises

8/18/2009 - 9/19/2009

23 WHOI and 41 SIO short period ocean bottom seismometers were deployed and recovered on the R/V Marcus Langseth.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code YN at the IRIS DMC. 

MOANA

Marine Observations of Anisotropy (MOANA)

Constraining Mantle Rheology, Mantle Flow, and Crust/Mantle Coupling Beneath New Zealand

PIs:

Anne Sheehan (UC Boulder)
Martha Savage (U of Wellington)
Tim Stern (U of Wellington)
Peter Molnar (UC Boulder)
John Collins (WHOI)
Brad Hager (MIT)
Greg Hirth (Brown)

 

OBSIP Workshop Presentation

JGR Publication

G-Cubed Publication

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #0409564): One of the critical questions in Continental Dynamics is: "What is the rheology of the system?" Do rocks deform in the ductile regime by diffusion creep (with strain rate proportional to stress), or by dislocation creep (where doubling the stress increases strain rates ~10 times)?. Is the lower crust relatively strong, with efficient coupling of strain between the crust and mantle, or weak, as in the classic "jelly sandwich" model? Is the upper mantle strong, as expected for dry peridotite, or weak, due to high volatile content? Is deformation in the upper mantle localized along shear zones beneath crustal faults, or distributed, as in thin viscous sheet models?

This is a project that will use seismic anisotropy to measure strain in the mantle and that when combined with mineral physics, to constrain deformation mechanisms and therefore to constrain rheology. The PIs maintain that the strike-slip system in New Zealand is the best place to study these relationships because the signal is large and simple with constraints at the surface provided by geology, GPS, and known relative plate motions for the last 45 million years. Specifically the project involves: 1) Deployment of 30 Ocean Bottom Seismographs; 2) Measurement of seismic anisotropy using a variety of techniques (shear-wave splitting, surface wave dispersion, Pn and Sn travel times, and receiver functions); 3) Calculations of mantle finite strain fields that might be responsible for anisotropy, constrained by relative plate motions and observed strain in New Zealand and considering a variety of vertical and lateral distributions of temperature and deformation mechanisms; and 4) Combination of laboratory, theoretical and seismological constraints on anisotropy to bound the conditions under which dislocation creep occurs.

Cruises

1/29/2009 - 2/6/2009

30 SIO broadband ocean bottom seismographs were deployed via the R/V Thomas Thompson.

1/26/2010 - 2/17/2010

28 of the instruments were recovered using the R/V Roger Revelle, one instrument was trawled up in June/July 2010 and was eventually returned, and one instrument washed ashore at an unknown sate and was recovered in 2011.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code ZU at the IRIS DMC. 

Lau Basin

 Lau Spreading Center Active-source Investigation (L-SCAN)

PIs:

Doug Wiens (WUSTL)

 

 

Cruise Report

Additional Lau Basin Studies

 

 

 

 

OBS deployments for the L-SCAN experiment.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #0426408): This is a combined active and passive seismic experiment along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center to test the following hypotheses. 1. Circulation in the mantle wedge is dominated by slab driven flow. 2. Interaction of the arc and backarc magma production controls the character of the ridge by influencing melt flux, petrology, and geochemistry. 3. Variations in the mantle melt supply control ridge crest features such as morphology, thermal structure, and hydrothermal venting. The passive experiment consists of 55 broadband ocean bottom seismographs and five land seismographs deployed for 10 months to image the larger-scale structure of the melt production region and the mantle flow pattern. The active source experiment consists of 100 ocean bottom seismographs deployed along a 250 km section of the spreading center extending from the inflated Vala Fa region to the magma-starved northern Eastern Lau Spreading Center where the axial melt lens is absent.

Cruises

1/24/2009 - 3/8/2009

59 short period OBSIP ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed, 25 were recovered and redeployed, and then all 59 were recovered on board the R/V Langseth. 

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under temporary network code YL and assembled data set ID #09-012 at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy. Research using OBSIP data should incorporate the suggested general OBSIP citation (http://www.obsip.org/about/citations/).

ALEUT

Alaska Langseth Experiment to Understand the megaThrust (ALEUT)

PIs:

Donna Shillington (LDEO)

 

 

 

Experiment Website

Experiment Blog

 

 

Map of planned survey (red lines),
offshore short period seismic deployment (red circles),
and temporary land broadband stations (red triangles).

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the cruise report): The aim of this program is to characterize the megathrust, overriding and downgoing plates, and other fault systems associated with the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone from the Shumagin gap, across the Semidi segment, to the western end of the Kodiak asperity. To achieve this, we will use multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection and wide-angle reflection/refraction (WARR) data, and relate the reflection and velocity images to the mechanical behavior of the megathrust and other faults based on the history of subduction earthquakes [Davies et al., 1981], historical intraslab and crustal earthquake hypocenter distribution, present-day locking of the plate boundary from GPS data [Fournier and Freymueller, 2007], and other available constraints. A secondary goal of the cruise is to conduct an oceanographic experiment to study the mixing processes in this area by acquiring hydrographic (XBT/XSV/XCTD/sea-surface salinity) data that are coincident in space and time with the collected MCS data. In support of the science objectives, we will collect the following coincident supplementary data: multibeam, sea bottom profiler (3.5 kHz Knudsen), magnetic, gravity, and navigation.

Cruises

6/29/2011 - 7/12/2011

42 Scripps short period ocean-bottom seismometers were deployed in two lines of 21 instruments on board the R/V Langseth. Several temporary land stations were also deployed concurrently, and all stations recorded shots from the R/V Langseth's 6600 cu. in. airgun.

7/11/2011 - 8/5/2011

MCS acquisition.

Data

Data from the ocean bottom seismometers will be archived at the IRIS DMC under temporary network code ZF and assembled data set ID 11-024. Temporary broadband land stations are archived under the temporary network code XM (2011).

Philippean Sea

Stephen

Apr 19 - May 12

Active source experiment with 6 OBSs and shots over a 14 day period.

Science Objectives:
1) Study the coherence and depth dependence of deep-water ambient noise and
signals.
2) Study the relationship between seafloor pressure and seafloor particle motion
for both ambient noise and short- and long-range signals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J15-3

Datasheet for the J15-3 acoustic source pictured above.

 

Salton Trough

Seismic Imaging of the Salton Sea (SSIP)

PIs:

Neal Driscoll (UCSD)

 

 

SSIP Website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #1132984): The Salton Trough is a critical structure where two very different styles of deformation meet; spreading-center dominated deformation to the south in the Gulf of California and dextral strike-slip deformation along the San Andreas fault system. Extremely high heat flow, young volcanism, shallow metamorphism and micro-seismicity led early researchers to interpret the southern Salton Sea as a buried spreading center with a NE-striking system of normal faults. To date, however, a critical portion of this system at the intersection between the San Andreas Fault with the Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ) in the southern Salton Sea remains poorly understood, in large part, due to a lack of seismic imaging in the Salton Sea. To address this problem, the NSF has funded two projects, one a marine seismic study of the Salton Trough and the other an onshore study. These projects are highly complementary in that seismic signals from both onshore and offshore will be recorded by both experiments, but the deployments of airguns for the projects requires a boat of sufficient size to deploy the ocean bottom seismometers and safely operate the airguns. 

Cruises

2/28/2011 - 3/17/2011

The complex southern end of the San Andreas fault includes an extensional stepover zone beneath the Salton Sea. This is an active source experiment that will deploy OBS and use airguns on the R/V Cross.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed will be archived at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy.

Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea

Woodlark Rift Imaging Experiment

deployment map

 

PIs:

Suzanne Baldwin (Syracuse)
Geoff Abers (LDEO)
Jim Gaherty (LDEO)

 

G-Cubed Publication

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure from Eilon et al., 2015. Click image to go to article.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from 2011 AGU Fall Meeting Abstract Abers et al.): Rifting and ocean-basin forming events are active only in a few places, although they represent the best accessible evidence for the early stages of continental breakup. One such place is the Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea, where a transition occurs along strike (with distance to the Euler pole) from limited continental extension, to large extension and formation of metamorphic core complexes, to full sea floor spreading. The exposures here provide access to both horizontal and vertical mass transport associated with rifting; the youngest ultra-high-pressure (UHP) rocks on the planet, 7-8 Ma coesite-eclogite, have been found within the metamorphic core complexes of the D'Entrecasteaux Islands [Baldwin et al., 2008]. These rocks have exhumed from c. 100 km depths at rates that must average 15 km/Ma, at least 50% of horizontal extension rates over this time period. This represents one of the few places where extension is clearly implicated in the exhumation of UHP rocks and perhaps one of the only places where UHP exhumation is still active. In order to understand how such exhumation could occur, we installed a 39-element broadband seismic array across the region of continental rifting of the D'Entrecasteaux Islands and Papuan Peninsula, including 8 ocean-bottom seismographs from the OBSIP broadband pool and 31 IRIS-PASSCAL broadband instruments on land. These data, being recovered in mid-2011, will provide the only sampling of both seismicity and wave propagation through the region of UHP exhumation and core complex formation. They complement a more limited data set collected in 1999-2000 to the east along strike, where continental rifting transitions to seafloor spreading. The latter data showed substantial crustal thinning and removal of mantle lithosphere beneath the axis of core complexes, although the spatial patterns and extension onshore could not be well determined, and seismicity associated with core-complex faulting remained enigmatic. The new, much denser array should resolve questions regarding the seismic nature of structures bounding the core complexes, variations in crustal structure, and hopefully the upper-mantle structures upon which the UHP rocks are exhumed. The data are collected in the context of a much larger Continental Dynamics project featuring structural geology, geochronology, volcanology, neotectonics, geodesy, and numerous other studies seeking to understand the metamorphism and its exhumation.

Cruises

1/24/2011 - 2/1/2011

8 SIO broadband ocean bottom seismographs were deployed and recovered on board the M/V Marcus Rankin.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code ZN at the IRIS DMC. 

Blanco Transform

The Blanco Transform OBS Experiment

Plate Boundary Evolution and Physics at an Oceanic Transform Fault System 

PIs:

John Nabelek (OSU)

Jochen Braunmiller (OSU)

 

 

 

 

Deployment of the Blanco experiment. Click image to go to interactive station map.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #1031858): Most earthquakes occur along the boundaries of rocky plates that make up the Earth's surface. Most great earthquakes occur where plates converge, as in Indonesia, Japan and Cascadia. Other damaging events are associated with transform faults, where the plates slide past each other, in places such as Turkey and along the San Andreas Fault in California. Oceanic Transform Faults (OTFs) in the seafloor are geologically simpler than those onshore, and thus offer a natural laboratory for studying their seismicity. This study will deploy a dense array of 55 Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBSs) off the coast of Oregon for one year to study the Blanco Transform fault. This deployment of OBSs will also be an important adjunct to the Cascadia Initiative (CI), an ongoing onshore/offshore seismic and geodetic experiment that includes an array of seismometers on the seafloor to complement an array of stations onshore. A primary aim of the Cascadia Initiative is to gain a better understanding seismicity associated with subduction along the Pacific margin of Washington, Oregon and northern California, where the risk of a megathrust earthquake is high. Among the broader impacts of this project are support for two graduate students and participation by several graduate students. The immediate scientific benefit is better understanding of seismicity and mechanics of Oceanic Transform Faults (OTFs), but the chief broader impact of this project will be its very significant contribution to the broader, Cascadia Initiative. 

Cruises

9/18/2012 - 10/1/2012

55 3-component seismometers and differential pressure gauges were deployed along the oceanic transform fault.

9/23/2013 - 10/6/2013

55 3-component seismometers recovered. No data recorded on CF cards at one station (BB270).

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed will be archived under temporary network code X9 at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy.

Juan de Fuca

The Juan de Fuca OBS Experiment

Evolution and hydration of the Juan de Fuca crust and uppermost mantle: a plate-scale seismic investigation from ridge to trench 

PIs:

Suzanne Carbotte (LDEO)

Helene Carton (LDEO)

Mladen Nedimovic (LDEO)

 

 

 

Deployment of the Juan de Fuca experiment. Click image to go to interactive station map.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #1029411): Subduction is a process in which oceanic crust and upper mantle are consumed beneath the margins of island arcs, such as Japan and Sumatra, or the margins of continents, as along the northwest coast of the U.S. Subducton gives rise to violent volcanic eruptions as well as great megathrust earthquakes and tsunamis. Dramatic demonstrations of the destructive effects of subduction have occurred recently in Indonesia, Japan, and Chile. Water released from the subducted plate is a significant, but poorly understood, contributor to these events; this seismic survey of the Juan de Fuca Plate has the specific aim of characterizing the plate from its formation at the ridge, through alteration and hydration of the plate as it ages, to subduction of the plate along the Cascadia margin. Owing to the very high risk of large earthquakes in Cascadia, improved understanding of the role of water in the subduction process is a primary broader impact of the survey. The project is also an important adjunct to the Cascadia Initiative, a multi-year deployment of instruments both onshore and offshore to study the structure and seismicity of the Cascadia region. 

Cruises

6/7/2012 - 7/4/2012

47 short period seismometers from SIO and WHOI were deployed.

7/5/2012 - 7/14/2012

Seismometers recovered. 

Scripps and Oregon State technicians deploy a short period instrument

Suzanne is a Senior Scientist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.  For additional information about Suzanne's research, go to her LDEO and professional website.  Additional Collaborators include:

  • J. Pablo Canales (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)
  • Helen Carton (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)
  • Mladen Nedimovic (Dalhousie University)
  • Anne Trehu (Oregon State University)
  • Geoffrey Abers (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)

OC1206A Cruise Report from the RV Oceanus OBS deployment and recovery cruise.

Description of the Juan de Fuca project science.

Juan de Fuca experiment OBS Metadata.

Cascadia in Motion

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed will be archived under temporary network code X6 at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy.

TAIGER

TAiwan Integrated GEodynamics Research (TAIGER)

deployment map

PIs:

Kirk McIntosh (UTIG)
Yosio Nakamura (UTIG)
Harm Van Avendonk (UTIG)
Francis Wu (Binghamton)
 

 

Experiment Website

 

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Award #1010642 and #0408609 Abstract): The TAIGER (Taiwan Integrated Geodynamics Research) project is a joint USA-Taiwan program that seeks to model the complex collision processes and the tectonic development of Taiwan, based on extensive observation. Funded by the NSF Continental Dynamics Program and by Taiwan's National Science Council and involving investigators at SUNY/Binghamton, UTIG, USC, Cornell, and Wisconsin, this project has acquired more than twice as much data as originally proposed due to synergistic contributions by Taiwan scientists and Taiwanese government science funding. From FY2006-2009, deployments of seismic instruments on land (IRIS) and at ocean-bottom (OBSIP) maximized the recording of local events and teleseisms, as well as artificial sources specially set off for TAIGER, in order to obtain high resolution 3-D images. To map the areas around Taiwan the PIs were able to use the NSF-supported research ship, the R/V Langseth, to create seismic waves that were recorded by a 6-km long streamer and also ocean-bottom and land recorders. These seismic and magnetotelluric profiles as well as petrologic lab data are currently being analyzed. TAIGER project data combined with geodynamics methods will be used to test a set of existing tectonic models that range from a thin skinned model, in which subduction of continental Eurasian mantle and lower crust is separated from a deforming crustal wedge by a plate boundary decollement, from a thick skinned model, where deformation of crust and mantle occurs within a vertically contiguous system, with progressive thickening of continental mantle beneath the core of the mountain belt.

Cruises

11/9/2007 - 11/17/2007

10 LDEO broadband ocean bottom seismometers were deployed on the Ocean Research 1. 

5/2008

10 LDEO broadband OBS were recovered and 20 deployed via the R/V Melville.

4/30/2009 - 6/3/2009

Deep-penetration seismic reflection data obtained on the R/V Langseth. 

6/8/2009 - 6/14/2009

18 LDEO broadband OBS were recovered on the R/V Langseth, with 2 instruments not recoverable.

6/14/2009 - 6/28/2009

Deep-penetration seismic reflection data obtained on the R/V Langseth. OBS deployed and recovered on Taiwanese ships.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code YM at the IRIS DMC. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2012

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Start Cruise Finish
Marianas 1  Wiens Thompson 26-Jan-2012 09-Feb-2012
Marianas 2  Wiens Langseth 04-Mar-2012 21-Mar-2012
Chile 1 Trehu Melville 4-May-2012 18-May-2012
Juan de Fuca 1 Carbotte Oceanus 07-Jun-2012 04-Jul-2012
Juan de Fuca 2 Carbotte Oceanus 05-Jul-2012 14-Jul-2012
Cascadia 2A Cascadia Oceanus 12-May-2012 26-May-2012
Cascadia 2B Cascadia Oceanus 12-Jul-2012 25-Jul-2012
Cascadia 2C Cascadia New Horizon 13-Jul-2012 20-Jul-2012
Cascadia 2D Cascadia Oceanus 13-Aug-2012 28-Aug-2012
Cascadia 2E Cascadia Oceanus 30-Aug-2012 07-Sep-2012
Cascadia 2F Cascadia Oceanus 09-Sep-2012 22-Sep-2012
Blanco Transform 1 Nabelek Melville 04-Sep-2012 07-Oct-2012
Cascadia 2G Cascadia Oceanus 06-Nov-2012 11-Nov-2012

2011

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Dates  
      Start Finish
Papua New Guinea Baldwin M/V Miss Rankin 24-Jan-2011 01-Feb-2011
Salton Trough Driscoll R/V Cross 28-Feb-2011 17-Mar-2011
Philippine Sea Stephen Revelle 19-Apr-2011 12-May-2011
Alaska Childs Langseth 05-Jun-2011 16-Jun-2011
GoAlaska Christeson Langseth 16-Jun-2011 20-Jun-2011
Cascadia McGuire Wecoma 23-Jun-2011 30-Jun-2011
ALEUT Shillington Langseth 28-Jun-2011 04-Aug-2011
Cascadia Cascadia Wecoma 23-Jun-2011 30-Jun-2011
Loihi (Hawaii) Caplan-Auerbach KOK 27-Jul-2011 02-Aug-2011
Alaska Childs Langseth 07-Aug-2011 01-Sep-2011
ALBACORE Kohler New Horizon 06-Sep-2011 13-Sep-2011
Cascadia Cascadia Wecoma 15-Oct-2011 12-Nov-2011
NoMelt Gaherty Langseth 26-Nov-2011 29-Dec-2011
GoM Lutken WHOI 3-Apr-2011 9-Apr-2011
Bering Sea Childs/Barth WHOI 21-Aug-2011 29-Aug-2011

2010

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Dates  
      Start Finish
SeaJade McGuire WHOI 13-Jul-2010 26-Jun-2011
Shatsky Korenaga WHOI 27-Jul-2010 01-Sep-2010
Loihi Caplan - Auerbach WHOI 17-Sep-2010 27-Jul-2011
ALBACORE     2010 2010
Cascadia-Keck     2010 2010

2009

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Dates  
      Start Finish
EPR - QDG SE Pacific McGuire Atlantis 11-Jan-2009 01-Feb-2009
Lau Basin Wiens Langseth 24-Jan-2009 08-Mar-2009
New Zealand Hager Thompson 29-Jan-2009 06-Feb-2009
NE Pacific Sari R/V alpha Helix 20-Apr-2009 03-May-2009
Taiwan II McIntosh Langseth/FR1 30-Apr-2009 03-Jun-2009
Taiwan III McIntosh Langseth 08-Jun-2009 14-Jun-2009
Taiwan IV McIntosh FR1 14-Jun-2009 28-Jun-2009
NE Pacific Trehu IV Wecoma 14-Jul-2009 20-Jul-2009
Endeavor Toomey Landseth 19-Aug-2009 10-Sep-2009
NE Pacific Sari IV      
Guam Forsyth Revelle 13-Oct-2009 02-Nov-2009
Lau Basin Wiens II Revelle 19-Nov-2009 05-Dec-2009

2008

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Dates  
      Start Finish
Costa Rica Holbrook WHOI 16-Feb-2008 09-Mar-2008
Costa Rica II Holbrook WHOI 19-Mar-2008 16-Apr-2008
QDG Active Source Mcguire WHOI 24-Apr-2008 11-May-2008

 

2007

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Dates  
      Start Finish

EPR-9N

Tolstoy Atlantis 10-Jan-2007 05-Feb-2007
PLUME III Hawaii Laske Kilo Moana 11-May-2007 6-Jun-2007
NE Pacific Trehu Wecoma 5-Sep-2007 11-Sep-2007
PLUME Hawaii Wooding Kilo Moana 31-Oct-2007 10-Nov-2007
TAIGER McIntosh Ocean Research 1 9-Nov-2007 17-Nov-2007
EPR - QDG SE Pacific McGuire Thompson 15-Dec-2007 17-Jan-2007
GEOPRICO II Ten Brink WHOI 11-Mar-2007 03-Sep-2007

 

ASTERO

2006

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Dates  
      Start Finish
PLUME Laske et al. TBS Jan-2006 Jan-2006
ERR-9N Tolstoy TBS Apr-2006 Apr-2006
Atlantis Massif Smith, Mcguire, Collins TBS Jul-2006 Jul-2006
Gulf of California Gaherty TBS 2006 2006
Augustine Volcano Ten Brink WHOI Feb-8-2006 Mar-27-2006

 

 

SKATE

2005

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Dates  
      Start Finish
PLUME Laske et al. Melville 7-Jan-2005 23-Jan-2005
Deception Island Wilcock Hesperides 5-Jan-2005  
Venezuela margin Vernon Sewart Johnson 11-Mar-2005 24-Mar-2005
ERR-9N Tolstoy Atlantis 23-Apr-2005 15-May-2005
Juan de Fuca Collins, Frye Thompson Jul-2005 Jul-2005
Atlantis Massif Smith, McGuire, Collins Knorr July-2005 July-2005
GEOPRICO ten Brink Mudboat April-2005 April-2005
Gulf of California Gaherty New Horizon 8-Oct-2005 30-Oct-2005
Puerto Rico ten Brink Mudboat Oct-2005 Oct-2005

Sea of Cortez Ocean Bottom Array

SCOOBA

TOMODEC

2004

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Dates  
      Start Finish
Nootka test  Frye WHOI 16-May-2004 05-Jul-2005
SE Caribbean Passive Experiment         
Venezuela  Vernon       
LOAPEX         

2003

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Dates  
      Start Finish
STAG  Sohn WHOI 25-Jun-2003 29-Mar-2004
Nootka test  Frye WHOI 20-Nov-2003  
EPR 9N         
Bermuda         

2002

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Start Cruise Finish
SEIR Cochran   11-Dec-2001 18-Jan-2002
Hydrate Ridge Pecher   16-Aug-2002 30-Aug-2002
GLIMPSE        
Marianas        
Gulf of California        

2001

Cruise Name PI Vessel Cruise Dates  
      Start Finish
Hart         
FAIM         
Exmouth         

 

FAIM

Far-offset Airgun Imaging of the Mantle (FAIM)

deployment map

PIs:

Jim Gaherty
Dan Lizarralde  

 

Cruise Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stations that are deployed as part of FAIM (yellow circles).

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #0002417): This project will investigate the seismic structure of oceanic mantle lithosphere using an active-source seismic refraction experiment along an 800-km-long transect in the Western Atlantic Ocean. The transect extends along a plate kinematic flow line that lies entirely within a single spreading-center segment, on lithosphere ranging from 87 to 145 million years old. The experiment will determine if the lithospheric mantle in the Atlantic is stratified, the magnitude and form of anisotropy over length scales of a few hundred kilometers, the constraints the character of oceanic Pn coda places on the nature of small-scale lateral heterogeneity, and the parameters that maximize the range at which mantle phases can be recorded using airgun source and ocean-bottom receivers.

Cruises

5/31/2001 - 6/30/2001

20 SIO L-CHEAPO ocean-bottom seismometers are deployed for a refraction experiment the R/V Maurice Ewing.

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under assembled data set ID #03-006 at the IRIS DMC. 

ALBACORE

Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment (ALBACORE) 

A 3D Seismic Study of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary in Southern California

Deployment map

 

PIs:

Monica Kohler (Caltech)
 

 

ALBACORE Website

JGR Publication

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #0825254): The Pacific-North America plate boundary in southern California is one of the only examples of recorded subduction of an oceanic spreading center in geological history, but this process is likely to be a common component of Earth history. Almost half of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in southern California lies offshore, but little is known about the physical properties of the oceanic plate, its mode of deformation, or its influence on western North America. This project will deploy 24 long-duration, broadband Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) in a passive seismic experiment off the coast of southern California that spans the oceanic half of the Pacific-North America plate boundary. The OBS data will be combined with same-event data recorded on the permanent California Integrated Seismic Network for coverage across the onshore basins, San Andreas fault, and into the North America plate. The objective is to understand the tectonic interaction at this boundary by identifying the physical properties and deformation styles of the Pacific plate and near-shore microplates, as well as distinguish among contrasting upper mantle geodynamic scenarios which predict large-scale mantle flow patterns beneath western North America. The seismic studies aim to characterize the driving plate motion consequences of collision between the rift system, a fragmented subducted plate, the lengthening of the San Andreas transform fault system, and block rotations. Of particular relevance is understanding the source of the forces and rheology that affect the stress state of the elastic crust to generate earthquakes. The boundaries for the seismic array overlap the region of complex breakup and fracture of the Pacific plate near-shore where several microplates are observed, and extends far to the west to provide comparison with oceanic lithosphere that is not fractured and has formed at a uniform rate. The results will aid in understanding the boundary forces due to relative plate motions, the driving forces and characteristics of oceanic and continental scale deformation, and how the continental margin accretionary process is influenced by offshore tectonics. An additional goal is to examine the local earthquake data and their focal mechanisms for seismicity patterns. The local seismicity recorded by the proposed OBS network is expected to produce a more accurate offshore hypocenter catalog that can be used to identify spatial relationships between background seismic activity with mapped offshore faults.

Cruises

8/14/2010 - 8/27/2010

24 SIO broadband and 10 short period ocean bottom seismographs were deployed on board the R/V Melville. [Cruise Report]

9/7/2011 - 9/16/2011

22 SIO broadband and 10 short period ocean bottom seismographs were recovered on the R/V New Horizon, 1 OBS was unresponsive and 1 did not rise from the sea floor. [Cruise Report]

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code 2D at the IRIS DMC. 

NoMelt

NoMelt 

Structure and evolution of the oceanic lithosphere/asthenosphere

PIs:

Jim Gaherty (LDEO), Lead
Dan Lizarralde (WHOI)
John Collins (WHOI)
Rob Evans (WHOI)
Greg Hirth (Brown)

Location of NoMelt study area. Click for source.

NoMelt Website

Nature - 6 July 2016 "High-resolution seismic constraints on flow dynamics in the oceanic asthenosphere" P.-Y. P. Lin, J. B. Gaherty, G. Jin, J. A. Collins, D. Lizarralde, R. L. Evans, and G. Hirth

LDEO News - 6 July 2016 "New Study Upends a Theory of How Earth’s Mantle Flows" S. Morford

Experiment Summary

The NO-MELT experiment addresses two questions: (1) What factors control the velocity structure of the lithosphere?, and (2) What is the origin of the boundary at 70-80 km depth and does it define the base of the lithosphere?

The experiment has deployed both active and passive ocean bottom seismometers as well as sea floor magnetotelluric instrumentation. The research vessel Marcus G. Langseth was used for the experiment. Funding provided by the US National Science Foundation's Marine Geology and Geophysics Program.

Cruises

11/26/2011 - 12/29/2011

61 SIO and WHOI ocean-bottom seismometers deployed on the R/V Langseth. 30 out of 34 short period instruments recovered after active source shooting is complete.

12/18/2012 - 1/15/2013

25 of out 27 SIO short period and long period ocean-bottom seismometers recovered on the R/V Melville. 

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed is archived under network code ZA and assembled dataset ID #12-001 at the IRIS DMC. This data has been made public two years after collection, per NSF policy, and is accessible using all IRIS DMC request tools.

  • 24 WHOI short period stations (200 and 1 sps seismic and hydrophone channels)
  • 3 SIO short period stations (200 sps seismic and hydrophone channels)
  • 22 SIO long period stations (50 sps broadband seismic and DPG channels)

Article about the 2012 cruise

NSF Award #0928270

Shatsky Rise

Shatsky Rise

Geophysical Constraints on Mechanisms of Ocean Plateau Formation from Shatsky Rise, Northwest Pacific

deployment map

 

PIs:

Jun Korenaga (Yale)
Will Sager (Texas A&M)

 

Shatsky Rise Website

Cruise Blog

EPSL Publication

JGR Publication

Nature Geosciences Publication

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #0927001): Deciphering the origins of the giant large igneous provinces is a critical element for understanding mantle dynamics and its relation to terrestrial magmatism. Among a dozen or so large oceanic plateaus in the oceans Shatsky Rise is an important target because of its unique tectonic setting. It is the only giant plateau formed at a time of frequent magnetic reversal anomalies that show its relationship to coeval spreading ridges. IODP Expedition 324 is currently also scheduled to sample the sediments and upper igneous layers at five sites on Shatsky Rise in late 2009, which could provide important ground-truthing. The PIs propose a collaborative geophysical project with two foci: (1) constraining the crustal structure by an OBS reflection and refraction experiment, and (2) delineating the tectonic history by MCS profiling and reanalysis of bathymetry and magnetic data. A new model of crustal seismic structure will constrain the nature of mantle melting on the basis of correlation between thickness and velocity. The detailed upper crustal structure revealed by MCS will help to reconstruct the tectonic history of Shatsky Rise, which appears to be a huge volcano formed at a triple junction and then split apart by seafloor spreading. The PIs will synthesize the results of these geophysical studies to build a comprehensive tectonic framework, including better estimations of eruption rate, its temporal variation, its relation to ridge kinematics, and the coeval evolution of the parental mantle.

Cruises

7/15/2010 - 9/14/2010

28 WHOI short period ocean bottom seismographs were deployed and recovered on board the R/V Marcus Langseth. [Cruise Report]

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code ZL at the IRIS DMC. 

SCOOBA

Sea of Cortez Ocean Bottom Array (SCOOBA) 

A seismic investigation of the influence of upper-mantle structure and dynamics on faulting, extension, and rifting in the Sea of Cortez (Gulf of California), Mexico.

deployment map

PIs:

Jim Gaherty (LDEO)
John Collins (WHOI)
Raul Castro (CICESE)

 

BSSA Publication

Poster Presentation

Southern Gulf Earthquake Catalog

SCOOBA Website

 

 

 

Experiment Summary

(Taken from NSF Abstract Award #0436411): In this experiment, which is part of the NSF Margins initiative on Rifting Continental Lithosphere, the investigators are deploying 18 wide-band ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) in the Gulf of California for a period of 15 months. These seismographs are recording naturally occurring seismicity (over 200 moderate and large earthquakes) from around the globe. Using these seismic recordings, the investigators are constructing images of the mantle beneath the Gulf and the surrounding region, providing a means to evaluate the degree to which mantle processes control lithospheric rupture and the initiation of seafloor spreading in the Gulf of California. The experiment is focused on two questions that are particularly important for achieving the goals of the Rifting Continental Lithosphere initiative: (1) Is the upper-mantle directly underlying Gulf of California extension anomalously hot? (2) To what extent do North-South variations in extensional style correlate with upper-mantle velocity variations? The OBS deployment also provides the means to better characterize seismically active faults within the Gulf of California, improving the assessment of the natural hazards environment of the region

Cruises

10/12/2005 - 10/21/2005

15 SIO broadband ocean bottom seismographs were deployed on board the R/V New Horizon. [Cruise Report]

10/1/2006 - 10/17/2006

14 SIO broadband ocean bottom seismographs were recovered on the R/V New Horizon, 1 OBS was unresponsive. [Cruise Report]

Data

Data from all instruments deployed are archived under temporary network code ZL at the IRIS DMC. 

ChilePEPPER

The 2010 Maule, Chile Earthquake: Project Evaluating Prism Post-Earthquake Response (Chile-PEPPER)

Post-seismic response updip of the Chilean megathrust earthquake of February 27, 2010 

PIs:

Anne Trehu (OSU)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ChilePEPPER experiment will utilize the seismometer and flow meter data to explore the slip behavior of the seafloor in this subduction zone.  Click image to go to interactive station map.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #1130013): Among the hazards that arise from large earthquakes are the direct effects of great earthquakes, as evidenced by last year's devastating earthquake off Japan, and local and distant effects of tsunamis. Though they pose enormous risks to life and property in highly populated areas, neither of these phenomena is as yet well understood. The recent great earthquake in Chile did not generate a large tsunami, probably because the rupture produce a surface break at the seafloor. Available evidence suggests that slip did not occur at depths shallower than about 30 km down-dip from the trench. Accordingly, the proponents of this project infer that the outer accretionary wedge that lies along the Chile coast above the rupture zone behaves as a poro-elastic medium that will adjust over time to the new stress regime caused by the earthquake. The aim of the proposal is to observe the effects of this transient adjustment, by deploying a focused array of ocean bottom seismographs equipped with flow meters. The principal broader impact of this effort is considerably improved understanding of megathrust earthquakes and tsunamis. 

Deployment map

Deck Plan

ChilePEPPER 2012 Cruise Report - LDEO deployment

ChilePEPPER 2013 Cruise Report - LDEO recovery

Dr. Anne Trehu's website 

Deploying an OBS from the R/V Melville

Cruises

5/4/2012 - 5/18/2012

10 Broadband OBSs with integrated flow meters are deployed from the R/V Melville in the zone of greatest slip during the February 27 2010 Maule earthquake.

3/15/2013 - 3/22/2013

Seismometers recovered.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed will be archived under temporary network code Z4 at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy.

OBSIP Schedules

All past, present and future OBSIP Schedules are made publicly available here.  Please note that these schedules only incorporate planned, funded experiments and are subject to change without notice at any time.  These schedules are posted to provide general guidance regarding the planned use of the OBSIP facility and should not generally be used for 'timed' planning of future experiments.  At any given time, multiple, unfunded experiments may be being 'considered' by OBSIP for any given slot of availability.  Please refer to the OBSIP Instrument Use Policies and Procedures when planning experiments.

Cascadia

Cascadia OBS deployment cruise during 2011

DATA AVAILABILITY FOR CASCADIA INITIATIVE

CHANNEL NAMING CONVENTIONS FOR CASCADIA INITIATIVE

CHANNEL RUNTIME AND DATA QUALITY RATING

CASCADIA DATA UPDATES AND CHANGES

CASCADIA DATA RESTRICTION AND REUPLOAD INFORMATION 

 

PIs:

The Cascadia Initiative is a community seismic experiment. Cascadia Cruises are led by the Cascadia Initiative Epedition Team (CIET), comprised of the following team of scientists:

  • Doug Toomey, Team Leader, University of Oregon
  • Richard Allen, University of California, Berkeley
  • John Collins, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
  • Bob Dziak, OSU/NOAA, Newport, OR
  • Emilie Hooft, University of Oregon
  • Dean Livelybrooks, University of Oregon
  • Jeff McGuire, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
  • Susan Schwartz, University of California, Santa Cruz
  • Maya Tolstoy, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory
  • Anne Trehu, Oregon State University
  • William Wilcock, University of Washington.

Experiment Summary

The Cascadia Intitiative is an onshore/offshore seismic and geodetic experiment deployed in the Pacific Northwest to study questions ranging from megathrust earthquakes to volcanic arc structure to the formation, deformation and hydration of the Juan De Fuca and Gorda plates.

As part of the 2009 Stimulus or ARRA (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) spending, NSF’s Ocean Sciences (OCE) division funded the construction of an amphibious array of 60 Ocean Bottom Seismometers by the three IIC’s for OBSIP.

Cascadia Amphibious Array Design

Twenty of the Lamont OBSs will be installed in trawl-resis- tant enclosures and will be available for deployments in water depths extending from the shelf down to 1,000 m. These 20 OBSs will be deployed via the ship’s wire and recovered using a Remotely-Operated Vehicle.

The OBSs will be utilized in four one-year deployments. These experiments will provide an offshore extension of the Earth- Scope Transportable Array (~70 km spacing) as well as 3 dense experiments focused on either imaging various properties of the thrust interface and forearc or recording local seismicity.

Experiment Website

Articles

Science 23 September 2016 "Tomography reveals buoyant asthenosphere accumulating beneath the Juan de Fuca plate" W. B. Hawley, R. M. Allen, and M. A. Richards.

Berkeley News 22 September 2016 "Seismic ‘CT scans’ reveal deep earth dynamics" W. Ravven.

Cruises

During 2015, OBSIP supported the following Cascadia cruises:

  • Cascadia 5A, RV Oceanus, Recover 15 WHOI OBS instruments - August/September
  • Cascadia 5B, RV Oceanus, Recover 15 SIO OBS instruments - September
  • Cascadia 5C, RV Atlantis, Recover 29 LDEO OBS instruments - September/October

During 2014, OBSIP supported the following Cascadia cruises:

  • Cascadia 4A, RV Oceanus, Recover 25 WHOI OBS instruments - June
  • Cascadia 4B, RV Oceanus, Recover 15 SIO OBS instruments - June
  • Cascadia 4C, RV Atlantis, Recover 30 LDEO OBS instruments - June/July
  • Cascadia 4D, RV Oceanus, Deploy 25 WHOI OBS instruments - August
  • Cascadia 4E, RV Oceanus, Deploy 15 SIO OBS instruments - August
  • Cascadia 4F, RV Oceanus, Deply 30 LDEO OBS instruments - August/September

During 2013, OBSIP supported the following Cascadia cruises:

  • Cascadia 3A, RV Oceanus, Recover 25 WHOI OBS instruments - June
  • Cascadia 3B, RV Oceanus, Recover 15 SIO OBS instruments - June
  • Cascadia 3C, RV Atlantis, Recover 30 LDEO OBS instruments - June/July
  • Cascadia 3D, RV Oceanus, Deploy 25 WHOI OBS instruments - August
  • Cascadia 3E, RV Oceanus, Deploy 15 SIO OBS instruments - August
  • Cascadia 3F, RV Oceanus, Deply 30 LDEO OBS instruments - August/September

During 2012, OBSIP supported the following Cascadia cruises:

  • Cascadia 2A, RV Oceanus, Recover 15 OBS instruments - May
  • Cascadia 2B, RV Thomas Thompson, Recover 24, Deploy 6 OBS instruments - July
  • Cascadia 2C, RV New Horizon, Recover 15 OBS instruments - July
  • Cascadia 2D, RV Oceanus, Deploy 15 OBS instruments - August
  • Cascadia 2E, RV Oceanus, Deploy 15 OBS instruments - August/September
  • Cascadia 2F, RV Oceanus, Deply 24 OBS instruments - September
  • Cascadia 2G, RV Oceanus, Contingency Cruise - November

Data

Data from the ocean bottom seismometers will be archived at the IRIS DMC under temporary network code 7D (four years of OBSIP deployments) and 7A (first deployment of WHOI-Keck). Temporary and permanent broadband land stations are archived under the network codes 5E (PASSCAL 2014-2015), BK (Berkeley Digital Seismograph Network), IU (Global Seismograph Network), TA (EarthScope Transportable Array), UO (University of Oregon Regional Network), US (US National Seismic Network), and UW (Pacific Northwest Regional Seismic Network). All stations will be available using the virtual network _CASCADIA.

Horizontal Orientations

The OBSIP Management Office has generated horizontal orientations for the third year of Cascadia OBS deployments.

The current version is: 2.1

Cascadia Horizontal Orientation Report 2013-2014 (15.1 MB)

Appendix B - Heli Plots long period filtered (269 MB)

Appendix Bb - Heli Plots short period filtered (5269 MB)

Year 3 Appendix C - PDF-PSD (5 MB)

Year 3 Appendix D - Orientations (11.4 MB)

Year 3 Appendix E -  Information about Year 2 Data Re-upload and Horizontal Convention Change (110 KB)

Year 3 Appendix F - Methods for Determining Possible Errors in Channel Orientations (3.4MB) 

 

The OBSIP Management Office has generated horizontal orientations for the second year of Cascadia OBS deployments. 

The current version is: 1.0

Cascadia Horizontal Orientation Report 2012-2013 (4.2MB)

Year 2 Appendix B - Heli Plots (247.2 MB)

Year 2 Appendix C - PDF-PSD (4.6MB)

Year 2 Appendix D - Orientations (68.3MB)

Year 2 Appendix E -  Information about Data Re-upload and Horizontal Convention Change(107 KB)

Year 2 Appendix F - Determining Possible Errors in Channel Orientations (3.2MB)

 

The OBSIP Management Office has generated horizontal orientations for the first year of Cascadia OBS deployments.  

The current version is: 3.0

Cascadia Horizontal Orientation Report 2011-2012 (9.1MB)

Year 1 Appendix B - Heli Plots (337MB)

Year 1 Appendix C - PDF-PSD (4.8MB)

Year 1 Appendix D - Orientations (55.5MB)

Year 1 Appendix E-– Information about Data Re-upload and Horizontal Convention Change (107 KB)

 

If you have any questions, please contact Kasey Aderhold (kasey@iris.edu).

Mariana

Mantle Serpentinization and Water Cycling Through the Mariana Trench and Forearc

 

PIs:

Doug Wiens (WUSTL)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deployment of the Marianas experiment. Click image to go to interactive station map.

Experiment Summary

(Taken from the NSF Abstract Award #0841074): This project will utilize active- and passive source seismic techniques, using short period and broad band OBSs, respectively, in the Mariana forearc, trench, and outer rise, in order to image the distribution of upper mantle serpentinization. This study will address a central question regarding the importance of serpentinite for understanding subduction zones. The research will quantify the flux of water subducted by upper-mantle serpentinite, and explore the relationships between serpentinization and seismicity in the outer forearc and outer rise.

Cruises

1/26/2012 - 2/9/2012

In early 2012, an experiment lead by Washington University in St. Louis Missouri and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution deployed both broadband and short period ocean-bottom seismometers in an area located along the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific Ocean. The experiment will image the distribution of serpentinite in the upper mantle and explore the relationships between serpentinization and seismicity in a subduction zone. The R/V Langseth was employed to shoot airguns over the short period OBS array of the active seismic portion of the experiment.

3/4/2013 - 3/21/2013

Broadband stations recovered.

Data

Data from all OBSIP instruments deployed will be archived under temporary network code XF at the IRIS DMC. Data will be restricted for two years following the experiment, per NSF policy.

Experiment Table

Experiments are archived by year in the tabs to the left. The table entries include links to experiment pages with detailed information such as principal investigators, experiment descriptions, cruise dates, and cruise blogs. Multi-year experiments are archived under the first year data was collected.

Year Experiment PI IIC Start End Network Code Status
2007

Central Oregon Locked Zone Array (COLZA)

Trehu SIO 2007/09/09 2009/09/11 ZH XA XN 14-041 Restricted
2006 Rota, Sinapalo, Mariana Islands   LDEO 2006/01/01 2008/01/02 ZC 04-019 Restricted
2012 Juan de Fuca Carbotte SIO, WHOI 2012/06/07 2012/07/23 X6 12-015 Open
2010 CD-Papua Baldwin SIO 2010/03/01 2011/08/01 ZN Open
2011 Gulf of Alaska (GoAlaska) Christeson WHOI 2011/06/16 2011/06/22 1B 11-017 Open
2013 Gorda Nabelek LDEO, SIO 2013/11/17 2015/12/12 Z5 Restricted
2015 Santorini Hooft SIO, WHOI 2015/11/17 2015/12/12 1E 15-008 Restricted
2016 Yellowstone Lake Sohn WHOI 2016/07/13 2018 YL Restricted
2016 Pisagua/Iquique Crustal Tomography to Understand the Region of the Earthquake Source (PICTURES) Trehu SIO 2016/10/26 2016/12/09 XW 16-005 Restricted
2015 Study of Extension and maGmatism in Malawi aNd Tanzania (SEGMeNT) Shillington SIO 2015/02/21 2015/10/10 YQ 16-010 Restricted
2016 Crustal Reflectivity Experiment Southern Transect (CREST) Reece WHOI 2016/01/04 2016/02/25 YB 16-003 Restricted
2014 Hikurangi Ocean Bottom Investigation of Tremor and Slow Slip (HOBITSS) Wallace LDEO 2014/05/10 2015/05/12 YH 8F Restricted
2003 Testing of a Deep-Water, Acoustically-Linked, Moored- Buoy Seafloor Observatory (ALST) Collins WHOI 2003/11/19 2004/01/18 ZT Open
2004 Development and Testing of a Deep-Water, Acoustically-Linked, Moored-Buoy Seafloor Observatory (Nootka) Collins WHOI 2004/05/16 2005/07/05 X1 Open
2006 Augustine Volcano Uri ten Brink WHOI 2006/02/08 2006/03/27 ZV Open
2002 Hydrate Ridge Pecher WHOI 2002/08/16 2002/08/30 ZU 03-003 Open
2001 Southeast Indian Ridge Cochran WHOI 2001/12/11 2002/01/18 ZM 02-011 Open
2012 East Coast Submarine Landslides Collins, Uri ten Brink, McGuire WHOI 2012/07/06 2012/12/07 ZS Restricted
2011 Bering Sea Barth, Wood WHOI 2011/08/20 2011/08/29 2B 11-016 Open
2011 Alaska Langseth Experiment to Understand the megaThrust (ALEUT) Shillington WHOI 2011/07/02 2011/07/12 ZF XM 11-024 Restricted
2010 Cascadia- Keck Community WHOI 2010/07/13 2011/06/28 7A Open
2010 Lo`ihi Volcano Caplan-Auerbach WHOI 2010/09/15 2011/08/02 9A Open
2012 Blanco Transform Nabelek SIO, WHOI 2012/09/18 2013/10/06 X9 Restricted
2003

Seismicity, Structure, and Fluid Flow of the TAG Hydrothermal System (STAG)

Sohn LDEO, WHOI 2003/06/25 2004/03/31 XI 07-002 Open
2011 Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Gerstoft WHOI 2011/04/03 2011/04/08 XJ 11-018 Open
2013 Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Haines, Hart WHOI 2013/04/18 2013/05/02 XZ 13-010 Restricted
2004 SE Caribbean Passive Experiment Levander, Collins WHOI 2004/04/20 2004/05/31 XT 06-009 Open
2005 TOMODEC Wilcock LDEO 2005/01/07 2005/01/13 XU Open
2007 GEOPRICO Uri ten Brink WHOI 2007/03/09 2007/09/06 YI Open
2005 GEOPRICO Uri ten Brink WHOI 2005/03/28 2005/11/15 YF Open
2009 Lau Basin Wiens LDEO, SIO, WHOI 2009/01/22 2010/12/03 YL Open
2009 Endeavor (ETOMO) Toomey WHOI 2009/08/22 2009/09/16 YN Open
2005 Plume Lithosphere Undersea Melt Experiment (PLUME) Laske, 
Orcutt  
SIO, WHOI 2005/01/05 2007/12/14 YS Open
2009 Pacific Lithosphere Anisotropy and Thickness Experiment (PLATE) Forsyth LDEO, SIO 2009/10/19 2010/11/01 Z6 Open
2011 NoMelt Gaherty WHOI 2011/11/30 2011/12/24 ZA Open
2007 Seismicity of Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar Transforms (QDG) McGuire SIO, WHOI 2007/12/23 2009/01/26 ZD Open
2010 Shatsky Rise Korenaga WHOI 2010/07/26 2010/09/02 ZL Open
2014 Eastern North America Community Seismic Experiment (ENAM) Community SIO, WHOI 2014/04/02 2015/04/06 YO Open
2005 Sea of Cortez Ocean Bottom Array (SCOOBA) Gaherty SIO 2005/10/16 2006/10/10 ZL Open
2005 Atlantis Massif Smith, McGuire WHOI 2005/6/5 2006/3/25 ZM Open
2011 Cascadia Community LDEO, SIO, WHOI 2011/07/25 2015/10/10 7D Open
2004 Calabria-Apennine-Tyrrhenian/Subduction Collision Accretion Network (CATSCAN) Tolstoy LDEO 2004/10/01 2005/08/24 YD Restricted
2007 TAIGER McIntosh LDEO, SIO 2007/11/13 2009/06/30 YM Restricted
2009 Marine Observations of Anisotropy (MOANA) Sheehan SIO 2009/01/31 2010/02/14 ZU Open
2012 Mariana Wiens LDEO, SIO, WHOI 2012/01/26 2013/02/10 XF Open
2003 Multi-Scale Seismic Imaging of the Mariana Subduction Factory Wiens LDEO 2003/06/12 2004/05/12 YY Open
2013 MARINER Canales SIO 2013/04/16 2014/01/09 X3 Restricted
2010 ALBACORE Kohler SIO 2010/08/15 2011/09/16 2D Open
2001 Gravity Lineations, Intraplate Melting, Petrologic and Seismic Expedition (GLIMPSE) Forsyth LDEO 2001/12/01 2002/11/25 2A Restricted
2008 Costa Rica Holbrook SIO, WHOI 2008/02/16 2008/04/18 XB,08-012,08-003 Open
2012 ChilePepper Trehu LDEO 2012/05/01 2013/03/22 Z4 Restricted
2001 Far-offset Airgun Imaging of the Mantle (FAIM) Gaherty SIO 2001/06/03 2001/06/27 03-006 Open
2001 Exmouth and Cuvier Margins Driscoll SIO 2001/11/02 2001/11/28 04-003 Open
2002 Gulf of California Lizarralde SIO 2002/09/16 2002/10/30 04-018 Restricted
2003 EPR 9N Tolstoy SIO 2003/09/01 2007/03/31 ZK 04-020 Restricted
2011 Salton Sea Driscoll SIO 2011/03/01 2011/03/31   Restricted

Experiment Map

OBSIP instruments are deployed world-wide to support geoscience.  This map of experiment locations is being updated on a regular basis.

 

 

Note: The black and white symbols show past OBSIP deployments with data currently available at the IRIS DMC. Clicking on a station will show a link to additional information about the experiment and station through the IRIS DMC MetaData Aggregator. Red markers show future deployments of OBSIP instruments and blue show current deployments.

Experiments

OBSIP has been involved in over 50 research experiments. Below you will find links to a few of our recent and ongoing experiments. A full list of OBSIP experiments can be found in the experiment table. Further details about individual experiments can be found on individual pages catagorized by deployment year. 

Full Experiment Table

Click on the images below to go to the experiment's page:

Cascadia (2011-2015)  

 

ENAM (2014-2015)

 

ChilePEPPER (2012-2013)

 

Juan de Fuca (2012)

 

NOMELT (2011-2012)

 

Shatsky Rise Active Source Experiment (2010-2012)

 

TAIGER (2007-2009)

 

SCOOBA (2005-2006)